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Fujifilm GFX100 and Lenses Firmware Updated, Sloppy Engineering by Fujifilm

When I first connected the Fujifilm iOS app to the Fujifilm GFX100, it alerted me to the availability of a firmware upgrade for the GFX100, which I installed—well done.

Problem is, the app did not alert me to the fact that every lens also had a firmware update. Nor did the GFX100 itself once upgraded. Huh?

The camera firmware could easily incorporate knowledge of the minimum required lens firmware for full compatibility—just incorporate that info into a firmware update and warn the user when a lens with old firmware is attached. How freaking hard is that to engineer?!

Since I cannot be sure that my initial work represents the results with the now-current firmware (I updated all lenses), I have to redo most of it. Which means reshooting and then redoing the work of organizing and assessing (much more time than the shooting). Which really pisses me off. Any pros out there love re-shooting jobs?

Fujifilm GFX-100

Given the results so far, I now have to assess whether I can rely on AF for critical work. And even if AF is seen to be reliable with the new firmware, then it remains to be seen how to avoid the killer feature of unstable lens focus (as in killing image sharpness). That must be done before I spend days shooting the GFX100.

It will take me a day or two of boring work to figure out how to reliably get an optimally focused image every time, if that is even possible. Then I can resume my review and share what I’ve learned, saving readers some hair. That said, not all my images were degraded from my initial shoot, so I still have some stuff to show.

Add to that mess the still extant problem that has plagued Fujifilm cameras for years: Play-Delete resets lens focus. Since I frequently check exposure by Play, deleting the file should I need to adjust exposure, this has caused serious usability harm for years. I cannot understand why Fujifilm does not fix this awful behavior. It’s not the only brain-dead thing still remaining, either.

I love the image quality with the GFX100, but it just stinks to put up with half-baked camera behavior. I hope someone at Fujifilm engineering reads this and takes action.

Not just me...

Jim Kasson reports similar issues in his work with Fujifilm GFX, and with other lenses, so it appears to be a general problem with Fujifilm GFX gear. See his posts: and . I have observed much worse issues than he has, but the behavior is the same— the lens focus just changes on its own regardless of camera settings and in 8 seconds or less, so it happens quickly.

Reviewing my work with the 63/2.8 a few days ago, I now see that it also suffers from unstable lens focus (a change in magnification is damning evidence). I am now convinced that the unstable lens focus behavior is an issue that applies to all the lenses, debunking my "LM" focusing motor theory.


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Reader Comment: Fujifilm Focusing Issues

Craig E writes:

As a landscape photographer, I am deeply interested in your ongoing Fujifilm GFX100 testing. Last year, I purchased a Fujifilm XT-30 for the sole purpose of time-lapse photography. After minimal testing, I drove into the wilderness 80 miles and set up the camera, fully enclosed in a steel case. Manual focus, with focus ring taped with gaffers.

A week later I returned, and found that focus had changed sometime during the first night. What I have learned is that switching the camera menu to M, and setting the lens switch to M (if the lens has a switch) is not enough to stop the camera from changing focus.

I’m not sure if there is one or even 3 settings to successfully shut down AF—I went through the menu and turned off everything af related—and I now have a fully manual focus camera. But!—only if I have the shutter button set to focus—if I set the camera to back button focus, the camera autofocuses with the body set to MF. It is all very weird. I have owned several Fujis and always want to love them, but never do.

fun88官网: in my experience with Fujifilm cameras, setting the camera to manual focus does nothing for focus stability; the unstable lens focus problem persists, which is absolutely awful for some shooting scenarios. See Fujifilm GFX100: Unstable Lens Focus for what can be done to deal with it—there is no good solution, only time-wasting workarounds that are not guaranteed to work.

It is quite possible that unstable lens focus with Fujifilm gear is an unfixable electromechanical design flaw. Since Fujifilm has done nothing to fix it in years, I am concluding that is the case.

Note also that Play then Delete always resets lens focus, regardless of any setting—not that it should be acceptable with any settings (except perhaps Pre-AF enabled). This idiotic and intensely frustrating behavior has dogged me for every Fujifilm camera I’ve used, wasting my time and causing errors so many times. I’ve had to train myself to never delete an image after doing Play until later.

As for AF-ON working with the camera set to manual focus: that’s the way it ought to work. It's just the smart thing to do. Think of it as an override feature: regardless of settings, pressing the AF-ON button initiates autofocus. This is very useful in manual focus mode.

As for me, Fujifilm has my wrath for neither the camera itself nor the iOS app warning me that there were new lens firmware downloads (the iOS app only warned about the camera itself). This wastes about an entire day of effort to redo my work at Stanford, which really pisses me off. I have to redo it because I cannot be sure that the results without the lens firmware updates represent the up-to-date behavior.

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Reader Comment: Sony Mirrorless Lenses on Nikon Z7 via Techart PRO Autofocus Adapter

John M writes:

Here’s hoping that you’ll be reviewing the TechArt PRO Autofocus Adapter for Sony E-Mount Lens to Nikon Z-Mount Camera.

When it’s available: I would be very interested in your review of the Zeiss 40/2 Batis as well as other of your favorite E lenses on the Nikon Z7.

fun88官网: one of my readers has one and it seems to work well.

The main issue is that I don't own a Nikon Z7, so evaluating it has to wait until I have a Z7 again (or its successor—will Nikon be aggressive in its camera body upgrades as Sony has been?). I'm swamped right now with the Fujifilm GFX100 and not far off is the Sony A7R IV, so it’s a low priority.

With the arrival of the Sony A7R IV, the idea of adapting E-mount lenses to a now out of date camera with lower resolution does not excite me. Still, I’ll likely give it a whirl if I have a Z series camera in my hands this fall.

As much as I prefer the ergonomics/haptics of the Nikon Z7 over Sony, I am increasingly less and less interested in lens adapters—they always involve some degree of hassle, extra parts to break or fail, etc. Also, the Nikon Z7 is 45 megapixels, but the new Sony A7R IV not only has a 61MP sensor, that sensor incorporates the very best/latest sensor technology with no need for an adapter. It’s a big job just to nail down various lenses on that much more demanding higher-res sensor.

Techart PRO Autofocus Adapter for Sony E-Mount Lens to Nikon Z-Mount Camera


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Fujifilm GF 110mm f/2 R LM WR Aperture Series: Tower at Night (Fujifilm GFX100)

This series at f/2, f/2.8, f4 explores the peak performance of the Fujifilm GF 110mm f/2 R LM WR, which is astonishing at 100 megapixels. The images show off the sensor with up to 30 second exposures.

Fujifilm GF 110mm f/2 R LM WR Aperture Series: Tower at Night (Fujifilm GFX100)

With one astonishing aperture of three, the issues of autofocus accuracy and unstable lens focus also stun.

Includes images up to full 100MP camera resolution along with crops.

1152 | 2304 | 3840
f2.8 @ 17.0 sec, ISO 100; 2019-07-20 21:36:39
[electronic shutter, LACA corrected, Enhance Details, vignetting corrected, distortion corrected]
Fujifilm GFX 100 + Fujifilm GF 110mm f/2 R LM WR @ 87mm equiv (110mm)

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Shootout: Fujifilm GF 110mm f/2 R WR vs Fujifilm GF 100-200mm f/5.6: Mosaic with Unstable Lens Focus (Fujifilm GFX-100)

This series from f/2 through f/11 compares the Fujifilm GF 110mm f/2 R LM WR to the Fujifilm GF 100-200mm f/5.6 R LM OIS WR on an extremely demanding target uniformly fine detail and texture on a planar target—the acid test for lens performance and one highly relevant to shooting scenes.

Findings on the unstable lens focus with the Fujifilm GFX system as well as peripheral forward field curvature and focus shift are discussed.

Shootout: Fujifilm GF 110mm f/2 R WR vs Fujifilm GF 100-200mm f/5.6: Mosaic with Unstable Lens Focus (Fujifilm GFX-100)

Includes images up to full 100MP camera resolution along with crops.

While there are some issues with unstable lens focus and field curvature, this series shows off the stunning potential of the latest generation of Sony sensors. The new Sony A7R IV uses the same underlying sensor technology, as does the PhaseOne IQ150.

CLICK TO VIEW: Fujifilm Medium Format Cameras, Lenses, Accessories

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f5.6 @ 1/9 sec, ISO 100; 2019-07-20 20:15:41
[distortion corrected, LACA corrected, Enhance Details, vignetting corrected]
GFX 100 + Fujifilm GF 110mm f/2 R LM WR @ 87mm equiv (110mm)

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Fujifilm GFX-100: ISO 50 vs 100, Sensor Transit Time, 16-bit vs 14-bit Capture, Unstable Lens Focus

I’ve started my Fujifilm GFX-100 review with some overview pages.

Fujifilm GFX-100: Does ISO 50 offer Any Value vs ISO 100?

Fujifilm GFX-100: Sensor Readout Transit Time for 16-bit vs 14-bit Capture

Fujifilm GFX-100: File Sizes in 16-bit vs 14-bit Capture

One one critical page for anyone using the Fujifilm GFX-100, Fujifilm GFX-50R/S:

Fujifilm GFX-100: Unstable Lens Focus

CLICK TO VIEW: Fujifilm Medium Format Cameras, Lenses, Accessories

 

Fujifilm GFX-100 rear view showing most of the numerous buttons


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My Top Picks for On-Sale Nikon DSLR and Zeiss DSLR/Mirrorless Lenses I Would use Myself

I often get asked about which lens performs best.

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CLICK TO VIEW: Top Picks for Zeiss DSLR Lenses for Nikon or Canon

CLICK TO VIEW: Top Picks for Zeiss Lenses for Sony Mirrorless

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Breakthrough Photography 6-stop ND Polarizer for Motion Blur in Broad Daylight + Reader Comments

My last trip included a lot of Voigtlander FE NOKTON 21mm f/1.4 and Canon RF 85mm f/1.2L and Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L and Canon RF 35mm f/1.8 Macro images. But it’s going to take some time to publish all that as I work through the Fujifilm GFX-100, whose clock is ticking on the loaner period. But I thought I’d show one interesting image here today.

Below, this image is a 4-frame focus stack with a Breakthrough Photography 6-stop ND polarizer. It allows shooting at relatively slow shutter speeds at mid-day, thus allowing motion blur.

CLICK TO VIEW: Breakthrough Photography Filters at B&H Photo

Since B&H Photo has a very limited selection of Breakthrough Photography products, be sure to visit the Breakthrough Photography web site at and specifically the .

Continues below...

Full resolution image available in Canon RF 85mm f/1.2L Examples: Eastern Sierra, more images later.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
Log across Mill Creek, Lundy Canyon
f11 @ 10.0 sec, ISO 50; 2019-07-16 13:05:06
[location “Lundy Canyon”, altitude 7600 ft / 2316 m, 70°F / 21°C, USM{8,50,0}, polarizer=Breakthrough Photography 6-stop ND polarizer, focus stack 4 frames]
Canon EOS R + RF85mm F1.2 L USM

John G writes:

Breakthrough Photography makes the best ND filters. Incredibly color neutral. But you must buy the X4 version for greatest color accuracy.

All the other filters I’ve tried, and I’ve tried nearly half-dozen brands, have severe color shift by comparison. Would your readers be bored to tears by an ND filter comparison? I would have save a ton of money if I hadn’t had to do the comparisons myself.

fun88官网: agreed—the X4 filters have outstanding coatings—see the and free .

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Low light transmission and green flaring are common problems with uncoated glass. As MRC coatings are added to each side of the optical disk light transmission steadily increases with flaring steadily decreasing. In our lab tests light transmission apexes at about 16-layers of MRC, and slowly decreasing in transmission at 18 and above. 8-layers of MRC are applied evenly to both sides of each optical disk resulting in MRC16.

Transmission spectrum using scan speed of 1200 nm/min at 2.00nm resolution. Analyzed on a

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Sony A7R IV: Which High-Speed and High-Capacity SDXC Cards Are Best?

See my Sony wishlist at B&H Photo.

The new Sony A7R IV has dual SDXC UHS-II card slots. The UHS-II designation means that extra pins are on the card to allow extra high speed reading and writing with cameras that support UHS-II. Cameras lacking that support read/write at slower speed.

Sony A7R IV

Terence M writes this just as I was looking into it!

What are your highly recommended SDXC cards for the Sony A7R IV? What about the Sony Tough cards, are they the best?

File size

Shooting 61-megapixel images is going to demand a lot of storage space and fast write and read times, both for writing and image review.

61 vs 42 megapixels means (61/42) * 86 MB/file ~= 125 MB per uncompressed raw file
61 vs 42 megapixels means (61/42) * 43 MB/file ~= 62 MB per compressed raw file
(assuming the same Sony 11+7 lossy compression format)

Sony 16-shot high-res mode will generate up to 16 * 125 = 2 gigabytes per capture uncompressed and still 16 * 62 = a gigabyte per capture compressed. Unless Sony comes up with a lossless compression format, guaranteed full image quality requires uncompressed format. That’s a storage disaster for both mult-shot and the 10 fps mode.

CLICK TO VIEW: Fast SDXC UHS-II camera storage cards

You’ll need a lot of storage on your computer. for how to do that well and how to .

CLICK TO VIEW: High Capacity Computer Storage

Write speed bandwidth

Plus, 10 fps means 1250 megabytes per second for uncompressed raw, and still a huge storage challenge at 620 MB/sec for compressed raw. You probably won't be fond of uncompressed raw at 10 fps for that reason! The fastest cards seem to write at 200 to 300 MB/sec.

But here are some links that steer you to what look like solid options. It seems that UHS-II at high speed does not come cheap.

I don’t like to count on “up to” write speed as that can be misleading—I want to see “minimum sustained write speed” quoted—many cards don’t say. For example, the SanDisk 128GB card below claims “up to 260MB/sec” but only guarantees that it won’t drop below 30 MB/sec—8 times slower! Similarly, the ProGrade offering guarantees only 90MB/sec, which is good, but far short of its 200MB/sec max speed. The Lexar 128GB offering guarantees a minimum 90 MB/sec which is quite good.

Then there are the Angelbird offerings which confuse the issue by claiming “sustained write speeds of 260 MB/sec” in conjunction with “minimum write speeds of 90 MB/sec”—confusing, but that’s as good a performance as seems to be available—but Sony Tough series matches it.

Below are some hand-picked candidates. I’m inclined to go with Sony SF-G Tough Series UHS-II SDXC card for several reasons: (1) absence of the annoying write-protect tab, (2) almost certain compatibility, (3) guaranteed minimum 90 MB/sec. I would much prefer a 256GB capacity but with dual card slots, dual 128GB cards is perfectly viable.

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Sony A7R IV: Serious Doubts About Viability of Sony 16-Shot High-Res Mode for Field Use

See my Sony wishlist at B&H Photo.

Sony A7R IV

The new Sony A7R IV has many appealing improvements, with Sony once again leading the technology race and while improving the ergonomics/haptics too. Just how other competitors can respond without still lagging behind is unclear, especially with Sony controlling the sensor market.zz

CLICK TO VIEW: Sony A7R IV + Highly Recommended Lenses

I will be buying the Sony A7R IV as it is a compelling upgrade in many ways. But I fear that the one feature that most interests me might turn out to be dead on arrival for field shooting: the Sony 16-Shot High-Res Mode feature.

The use of SDXC cards in the Sony 7R IV is disappointing; I vastly prefer XQD cards as used in the Nikon Z7 and Panasonic S1R. SDXC cards are just not robust, with several of my cards disintegrating with use, and the locking pin is frequently being a problem too (self locking upon insertion all too often). There are cards now without the idiotic locking pin, which is all I will buy in the future for SDXC.

How Sony 16-Shot High-Res Mode works as I understand it

Sony has done a poor job of explaining just how the 16-Shot High-Res Mode feature works . The video is a nerd thing showing how pixels and sub-pixels overlap and say nothing about shooting speed, inter-frame time gap (if any), card-write time, or post-processing issues, such as how motion is handled. Or whether Sony’s required computer software processing is better than its prior toy-grade implementation.

Here is what I gather, and I hope I am mistaken about some of these points:

  • The Sony A7R IV makes 16 exposures using pixel shift in various ways to in effect quadruple the number of pixels captured, and with each having full RGB true-color information. In theory, wonderful quality. This is somewhat different than Panasonic S1R, which makes eight (8) exposures. So presumably Sony’s peak quality will be superior.
  • The Sony A7R IV apparently stores sixteen (16) separate files on the camera card, for a whopping gigabyte or more for a single capture. That’s a striking difference in two ways: 16 separate files and a 1000+ megabytes versus the 342MB single raw files of the Panasonic S1R (plus optional single-shot frame)—Sony is a 3X larger hit—a huge nuisance and waste of space and you'd better have a very fast SDXC card.
  • Sony apparently does zero in-camera processing for multi-shot. Compare that to Panasonic which uses sophisticated in-camera processing to produce a single convenient raw file usable immediately in any raw converter.

What’s appears to be unworkable with Sony’s implementation

With those assumptions, here are my concerns, which have many undesirable implications for both capture and processing.

1. Exposure time

Sony’s current pixel shift on the Sony A7R III interposes a minimum 1/2 second delay between exposures (adding 1.5 seconds to the total time required). In the field as a practical matter, this guarantees motion/lighting artifacts resulting in godawful checkerboarding, disgusting me so many times that I gave up on pixel shift on the Sony A7R III. And that is only 4-shot pixel shift! It is why I lauded the Panasonic S1R, which exposes its 8 frames as fast as the exposure time allows and has sophisticated in-camera generation of a single raw file.

The chance of motion/lighting artifacts for 16 vs 8 exposures is in practice not just twice as likely. It is probably 10X higher under so many field conditions. I might be able to time an 8 frame exposure on the Panasonic S1R such that wind or lighting issues are minimized, but it’s drastically harder to do so for twice as long a time—lulls in wind and shifts in lighting are impatient with photographers. Already on the Sony A7R III, 4-frame pixel shift has been proven to be troubled even under ideal conditions.

With sixteen frames instead of four, any delay adds up to a lot of time in terms of subject changes, which includes shadows/lighting as the sun or clouds move!

Even assuming zero inter-frame delay for 16 frames, sixteen exposures is a lengthy duration in which motion artifacts and lighting changes guarantee problems, even under ideal conditions.

Therefore, unless the Sony processing software has exceptionally sophisticated ways of dealing with motion/lighting artifacts that are far superior to the Panasonic S1R, I see no hope for field use.

Checkerboarding with moving water
f6.3 @ 1/160 sec PixelShift, ISO 100; 2019-07-10 19:05:37
Sony A7R III + Voigtlander FE NOKTON 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical
Checkerboarding with moving water
f6.3 @ 1/160 sec PixelShift, ISO 100; 2019-07-10 19:05:37
Sony A7R III + Voigtlander FE NOKTON 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical

2. Lack of in-camera processing, no raw file, huge file count

Sony’s 4-frame pixel shift on the Sony A7R III is a huge hassle: if I want to delete the single capture, I have to delete 4 separate files one-by-one. With 16-shot mode, will I have to delete 16 frames one-by-one?

Storage needs are problematic. With the Panasonic S1R, 324MB finished raw files on the Panasonic S1R are one thing, but 1000+ megabytes scattered across 16 separate files is quite another.

Perhaps 120 images on a 128GB card = buy a pocketful of expensive storage cards—fast SDXC UHS-II cards are not cheap, and that speed is important.

Because there is no in-camera raw file produced as with the Panasonic S1R, there is no way to determine whether the final assembled image is OK in terms of focus and depth of fieldthis cannot be done satisfactorily at normal resolution but that’s all the A7R IV has—16 separate images at standard resolution.

I know this from extensive field experience with the Panasonic S1R that I have to be able to check the full resolution multi-shot image. With the S1R, the shot discipline demands are the hardest of anything I have ever done with any camera, and the Sony A7R IV increases that substantially over the S1R (16% more resolution, linearly). Yet Sony defeats any ability to verify the essentials of focus and depth of field, by not providing any high-res image in-camera.

3. Workflow

Not being able to review the full resolution image in camera as with the Panasonic S1R is a very serious field-usage flaw with the Sony A7R IV, bad enough on its own.

But consider that Sony’s solution is to require usage of Sony imaging software. That’s a serious headache for workflow, versus just importing into Lightroom or Photoshop. And it might be iterative, meaning, do and redo and redo and redo in the Sony software with various parameters to fix artifacts. Assuming it even can.

In the best case Sony’s imaging software will perform brilliantly and using all CPU cores and GPU power, with sophisticated handling of motion/lighting artifacts accruing from field use. I am not feeling hopeful on any of those points.

It’s also possible that Adobe could do something useful, but that never happened for 4-shot pixels shift, so it seems doubtful.


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Reader Question: Zeiss Otus vs Voigtlander APO Lenses for Sony 16-Shot High-Res mode

See my Sony wishlist at B&H Photo.

Stefan I writes:

I’m a long term subscriber and I absolutely appreciate your work. You’ve saved me save money, several times, as your recommendations have been spot-on. The last time I almost bought a Leica 24-90mm SL zoom, planning a transition to the Panasonic S1R, but your well executed review made me reconsider, at the last minute.

I’ve been waiting for the multishot capability to be added to the Sony ecosystem ever since the Sony A7R III came out. For my large gallery prints (2m to 3m wide) there are never enough pixels. Currently I’m doing all sorts of stitching (flat, nodal, mixed) combined with focus stacking or lens tilts / swings. But it’s very time consuming, and I would rather spend my time on composition and light than technicalities.

I have a question: Based on your experience with Panasonic’s multishot implementation, and with all sorts of lenses, will there be a meaningful difference at 200+ true-color megapixels, at f 5.6 / f8, between a Voigtlander FE 65mm f/2 APO and Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 APO-Distagon (or even a Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art for that matter) ? Same thing about the Voigtlander 21mm f/1.4 vs Zeiss Otus 28mm f/1.4 APO-Distagon.

I appreciate the 21mm FOV a lot more than 28mm, but hanging on to my Otus, and lugging it around just for the sake of absolute IQ and resolution. Again, we are talking about optimal shooting conditions: f 5.6 to f8 for all lenses, solid tripod and head, remote etc.

I’m tired of lugging around adapted DSLR bricks, I would really like to trade in my Otuses for Voigtlanders - the 110 APO has already made an excellent impression, but then, again, I haven’t tested any of my lenses on 200MP shots. Your thoughts on this topic would be greatly appreciated. Best regards,

fun88官网: I am more than a little concerned that the Sony 16-shot high-res mode implementation will not be field usable as is the Panasonic Multi-Shot High-Res mode. There are numerous drawbacks in its implementation also.

the Leica 24-90mm f/2.8-4 Vario-Elmarit-SL ASPH OIS was at best a mediocre performer on the Panasonic S1R in multi-shot high-res mode coupled with seriously damaging focus shift—just not a reliable instrument for the purpose. I didn’t publish many results with it, so disappointing was it, which is not to say it’s bad, just that it is way below the results I could get with the primes, or the Leica 16-35mm f/3.5-4.5 Super-Vario-Elmar-SL ASPH.

But to the point: Zeiss Otus lenses did not behave as I expected on the Panasonic S1R. While I was able to achieve high-grade results, field curvature in the outer zones and unexpected focus shift that does not exist on the Nikon D850 caused me some grief. It suggests an interaction with sensor cover glass—high performance lenses can be quite sensitive to relatively small differences in cover glass thickness. Along with the size and weight, this also makes me ponder whether other choices are better.

Accordingly, when I explore the Sony 16-shot high-res mode implementation, I will be paying close attention to how Zeiss Otus lenses behave, and I also intend to test the Voigtlander FE NOKTON 21mm f/1.4 Aspheric, Voigtlander FE MACRO APO-LANTHAR 65mm f/2 APO and Voigtlander FE MACRO APO-LANTHAR 110mm f/2.5. Since they are native-mount and designed fresh for Sony cameras, I expect very high performance. Which is not a statement that color, flare control and other aspects are up to Zeiss Otus levels—just a comment on resolution.

In my view, Zeiss is not taking the mirrorless market seriously: the failure to produce reasonable size/weight lenses for mirrorless with better than Otus-grade performance (quite possible with an f/2 or f/2.8 lens speed) is a strategic mistake IMO, at least if there is any desire to remain relevant. Something half the size of an Otus with Otus+ performance and a stop or even two less speed would be VERY appealing. While the Zeiss Loxia and Zeiss Batis lenses are strong offerings, they can no longer claim to be the best—witness at the least the stellar Sony FE 135mm f/1.8 GM and the Voigtlander FE NOKTON 21mm f/1.4 Aspheric.

CLICK TO VIEW: Sony A7R IV and Highly Recommended Lenses (partial list)

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Fujifilm GFX-100 is Confoundingly Complicated

Get Fujifilm GFX-100 at B&H Photo.

For the first time ever in 11 years of reviewing cameras, I do not feel I can use a camera (GFX-100) without a significant risk of problems/mistakes that would ruin the shoot. The Fujifilm GFX-100 has so many buttons, many tiny, that are easily pressed just by holding or handling the camera, each of which can make a serious change to shooting parameters.

It is the anti-Hasselblad X1D!

As just one example, the front dial was pre-set to change the ISO and it wraps around, making it easy to go from ISO 50 to ISO 32000 without even noticing. Yikes.

Looks like a long read of the manual, which is on par with the average in not really explaining much. It will take hours to sort it all out.

I’m sure I’ll sort it out satisfactorily but there is something badly thought out about the whole idea of so many actively risky buttons sprinkled around the camera in seemingly random positions, all of which one has to actively reprogram or deprogram or at least memorize and remember not to touch. I could not for example figure out how to set aperture priority, meaning that I succeeded eventually, but the logic of how I got there escapes me.

Add in baked-in JPEG-centric settings in the Q menu (totally useless to my raw shooting), and it feels incoherent.

So I am having to methodically go through and deprogram all sorts of things. It's a tedious unnecessary task had it been designed better. The Fujifilm GFX-50S did not have this issue. I don't see this design helping anyone; it's cognitive and haptic overload to make use of all the buttons.

Fujifilm GFX-100 rear view showing most of the numerous buttons

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A Big Thank You to Those Who Took Action in Response to Last Night’s Email + Reducing Ad Clutter

I’ve long desired to reduce the ad clutter on this site. Note that since subscriber pages have few to no ads* , we’re talking almost entirely about this blog, which is free to all.

Last night I sent an email titled “request from Lloyd Chambers at www.xiaoduboke.com, plus 🔥 Sony A7R IV ordering” to all subscribers.

My appreciation and big thank you to those who responded, and especially to those who purchased the Sony A7R IV. B&H tells me it was a 4-year best sales day—the test worked beautifully. I did that test for a reason!

* A very few subscriber pages have products shown as a convenience out of the way at the very end of the page after all the review content. Out of the way, but handy..

Win-Win-Win

Contact me with feedback.

Would you partner with me to reduce ad clutter by accepting just a few promotional emails? Emails that you act on—clicking through at least, and buying when the product matches plans*.

I’m talking about once or twice a month (on average), with emails especially targeting the release of significant and desirable new products—curated stuff I choose by hand. And/or products that I have found personally excellent and valuable.

Here’s why accepting a few promotional emails can be a win for you, me, and B&H Photo:

  • Reducing ad presence helps readers and subscribers because I can spend more time publishing content, since I would spend less time dealing with ads.
  • Reduced ad presence is a better experience for all.
  • B&H has generously loaned me gear for over a decade now—more important than ever given the huge costs of the latest gear. Prioritized loaners are critical to me covering the gear you all want to hear about. B&H deserves your patronage.

If I can rely on some level of purchasing through these occasional promotional emails, then ads for B&H Photo can take a back seat. Regular blog readers who are not subscribers would be encouraged to join the list.

I would offer some level of control over the emails (on or off to start), but who would want to decline while enjoying the benefits when the vast majority of subscribers are partnering to make the experience better for all?

For now, the OWC (MacSales.com) ads are critical and I am not in a position to make changes there, but the same model might be possible—TBD. My ultimate goal is fewer ads, more content front and center.

* B&H Photo ships overseas, but I realize that some overseas subscribers don’t find this convenient in many countries (customs clearance in particular). Still, just by clicking through and at least considering it, overseas readers can contribute to the benefit of having fewer ads.

EASY and FAST way to steer towards fewer ads

Buy using www.xiaoduboke.com links/ads as follows:

1. Go to www.xiaoduboke.com
2. Click through any link or ad to B&H Photo (or OWC).

- One click-through on any link to B&H attributes sales to www.xiaoduboke.com in that browser session. - No need to click through over and over, unless you quit the browser.
- High-priced items count the most, as total dollar amount is the most important metric.
- click-throughs even without purchase show interest too!
- Does NOT work: adding yourself to a B&H mailing list, and ordering through email link in email from B&H. Love

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Sony A7R IV Takes the Floor

I am sure Sony planned the Sony A7R IV announcement for my drive home from Yosemite followed by my dentist visit for four new front crowns—busy day yesterday! Sony must have an 'in' with someone in Scott’s Simulation.

It’s nice to have real teeth again (six were broken during my Dec 30 bike crash).

I will have a lot to say about the Sony A7R IV in coming days and in my in-depth review. There is much to like, and yet the most important feature of the Sony A7R IV (for me) looks to be dead on arrival for practical use.

Sony A7R IV

I can’t foresee any company overtaking Sony at this point. Mirrorless is Sony. Sony is mirrorless. All the other me-too'ers are there to keep the Sony juggernaut going via a competitive pressure. Sony dominates the sensor business too. Fujifilm has wisely staked out the medium format area with Hasselblad a distant second. The DSLR is dead.

Meanwhile, the Fujifilm GFX-100 is here and I have a backlog on Canon EOS R and the Voigtlander FE NOKTON 21mm f/1.4 Aspheric. I will interleave coverage of the two latter items into my coverage of the GFX-100.

How much better will medium format have to be to beat the advancing 35mm state of the art? Perhaps a multi-shot high-res mode on the Fujifilm GFX-100 with a firmware update?

Sony A7R IV — high demand, pre-order for priority

Due to ship on September 12, we’re 8 weeks away from when I can start reviewing.

Demand 🔥 is likely to be high, pre-order the Sony A7R IV ASAP.

CLICK TO VIEW: Sony A7R IV and Highly Recommended Lenses (partial list)

Help me help you

I need your help.

B&H Photo has generously loaned gear to me for over a decade. Loaner gear is critical to my reviews. But B&H needs something in return: sales originating from www.xiaoduboke.com.

When sales from www.xiaoduboke.com fall off, I must divert time to ads/promotion, which takes time away from my review coverage and blog. Such as this afternoon, when I would have much preferred writing all about the new Sony A7R IV.

I don't like too many ads—they clutter things and distract. If readers can make a habit of buying through links to B&H Photo, over time I hope to reduce the clutter.

EASY and FAST way to help me and you: buy using www.xiaoduboke.com links/ads

1. Go to www.xiaoduboke.com
2. Click through any link or ad to B&H Photo (or OWC).

- One click-through on any link to B&H attributes sales to www.xiaoduboke.com in that browser session. - No need to click through over and over, unless you quit the browser.
- High-priced items count the most, as total dollar amount is the most important metric.
- click-throughs even without purchase show interest too!
- Does NOT work: adding yourself to a B&H mailing list, and ordering through email link in email from B&H. Love

Amazon for other stuff? Bookmark

Thanks!

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Lundy Canyon Resident Beaver Made it Through Winter + Sow and Cub (black bear)

I’ll be home tomorrow with a bunch of material—I got enough and enough variety in spite of being laid low by a back problem for 3 days—can hike again now.

The resident beaver (there are others up and down too) made it through the winter.

I saw a nice healthy sow (female bear) as I drove in at dusk... she stood up on hind legs to check me out when I got out of the car. A beautiful orange colored black bear (not black at all). Coloration looked more like a grizzly than a black bear but fortunately there are only black bears in California.

A bit later while driving out, I spotted a furball of a bear cub. I decided not to photography there that evening, not so much because I was worried about safety for myself, but I prefer the windows and doors on intact rather than lying on the ground torn away. I would advise anyone visiting Lundy Canyon to take appropriate precautions because sooner or later bears discover what an ice chest means. There are no bear boxes at the Lundy Canyon trailhead.

Kudos to Canon’s superb focusing in low light. The Canon EOS R just nails it and the Canon RF 85mm f/1.2L is everything I might hope for in a lens.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f1.2 @ 1/80 sec, ISO 50; 2019-07-15 19:57:19
Canon EOS R + RF85mm F1.2 L USM

The tweaked back was OK 4 days later.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f1.8 @ 1/2200 sec, ISO 20; 2019-07-10 18:12:12 [altitude 7381 ft / 2250 m]
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Three Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L USM Aperture Series: Lee Vining Creek Through Meadow + Young Pine Amid Its Ancestors + Mt Dana, Earth Shadow Rising (Canon 5Ds R)

This series looks at far distance performance of the Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L USM.

The 200/1.8L ceased production around the time DSLRs emerged. Its predecessor, the Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM, is 1/3 stop slower and might have better performance in various ways.

So how does the 200/1.8L hold up at 50 megapixels, a challenge never envisioned when the lens was designed?

Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L USM Aperture Series: Lee Vining Creek Through Meadow

Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L USM Aperture Series: Young Pine Amid Its Ancestors

Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L USM Aperture Series: Mt Dana, Earth Shadow Rising

Includes images up to full camera resolution.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f1.8 @ 1/200 sec, ISO 100; 2019-07-12 18:49:31
[location “Lee Vining Creek”, altitude 9500 ft / 2896 m, 60°F / 15°C, LACA corrected, Enhance Details]
Canon EOS 5DS R + Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L USM
1296 | 2592 | 4320
f2.8 @ 1/6 sec, ISO 50; 2019-07-12 19:54:28
[location “Mt Dana from Saddlebag Lake area”, altitude 10000 ft / 3048 m, 60°F / 15°C, USM{8,50,0}, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
Canon EOS 5DS R + Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L USM
1296 | 2592 | 4320
f4 @ 1/25 sec, ISO 100; 2019-07-12 19:08:27
[location “Saddlebag Lake area”, altitude 9950 ft / 3033 m, 60°F / 15°C, LACA corrected, Enhance Details]
Canon EOS 5DS R + Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L USM

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Snow Levels in Sierra Nevada Appear to Be a Record

With a quite cool May and June and heavy dumps of snow in May, the winter of 2018/2019 might not have brought record snowfall, but to all appearances the July snowpack is the greatest I’ve ever seen it. Below is Mt Dana, still with a hefty covering of snow.

I had planned to hike Glacier Canyon (the canyon at left of this image) today, but a sciatica-like reaction following a long and late hike has been very painful and left me unable to ponder hiking more than a few hundred yards at best. Things just seized up in my lower left back, perhaps no surprise given ongoing issues with it. I’m not looking forward to carrying the Fujifilm GFX-100 around. [Update July 14: as far as I can tell, super tight muscle/tendons are key aspects one of the side effects lingering from antiobiotic use in March/April, so I did two things to address the tightness (cycling and muscle relaxant) and am back to baseline and can walk around again]

1296 | 2592 | 4320 | 6000
f5.6 @ 0.6 sec, ISO 50; 2019-07-12 19:54:41
[location “Mt Dana seen from Saddlebag Lake area”, altitude 9960 ft / 3036 m, 60°F / 15°C, LACA corrected]
Canon EOS 5DS R + Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L USM

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Canon RF 85mm f/1.2L Aperture Series: Lingering July Ice on Exfoliating Granite (Canon EOS R)

This series evaluates the Canon RF 85mm f/1.2L at far distance on the 30-megapixel Canon EOS R, looking for sharpness, field curvature, color correction.

Canon RF 85mm f/1.2L Lingering July Ice on Exfoliating Granite

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/1.2 to f/5.6.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f1.2 @ 1/8000 sec, ISO 100; 2019-07-11 19:50:21
[location “Tenaya Canyon”, altitude 7400 ft / 2256 m, 70°F / 21°C, vignetting corrected, polarizer=Zeiss, Enhance Details]
Canon EOS R + RF85mm F1.2 L USM
Voigtlander 21/1.4 for Sony FE

2 aspherical elements, 4 partial dispersion elements, floating elements, manual focus, 12 blade diaphragm, EXIF transfer.

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Canon RF 85mm f/1.2L: Evaluating White Balance and Tint When Stopping Down

With most if not all f/1.2 and f/1.4 lenses, there can be a significant shift in color when stopping down. The effect can vary with the sensor/camera, being particularly noticeable with the Nikon D850 for example. See the three examples in my review of the Sigma 105mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art.

This page looks at white balance and tint shifts from f/1.2 through f/5.6 with the Canon RF 85mm f/1.2L.

Canon RF 85mm f/1.2L White Balance and Tint Across Apertures

These white balance and tint results differ substantially from the results show in Canon EOS R White Balance and Tint in Adobe Camera Raw. In that article, I noted a “whacky white balance and tint”. It appears that Adobe fixed a bug.

CLICK TO VIEW: Highly Recommended Canon mirrorless


(Gear Acquisition Syndrome)

Reader Comment: Zeiss Loxia 21/2.4 and Voigtlander FE 21/1.4:

Sebastian TR writes:

Voigtlander FE 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical

Just wanted to say, have really been enjoying your mirrorless lens comparisons of late - in particular the Sony FE mount - absolutely fantastic resource you have built up (and are building up!).

I originally used your article a year ago before a trip to Japan to help purchase the Zeiss Loxa 21/2.4 and it has been spectacular - really pleased with the decision helped by your article! :)

Just reading about this new Voigtlander - seems to be getting quite a few well received reviews! After this particular comparison, just a couple of questions:

1) Have heard a fair bit about sample variation on Loxias in addition to field curvature effecting things - assume your copy is good / still the same from the original review? Also if due to the field curvature on the loxia - assume this explains why it's not performing as good with this "oblique" perspective / focus point? ( although left @ 2.8 seems to be quite different on the lox

2)The loxia shots look to be taken with a bit less available light / reflective ambient light - just wondering if that could make a difference in lens performance , and explain part of the difference ? Also noticing on the right side (the sandstone bricks) seem to have a bit better highlight rolloff on the Zeiss 21 - wondering if that is a colour rendering thing or again the ambient light changing shifting tone?

3) Would love to see / get your thoughts on how the Loxia compares to the Voigtlander in regards to chromatic aberration , colour control and flare?* *(often use the Loxia for film work as well as photography - so these elements are just as important as resolution / micro contrast to me :)

Zeiss Loxia 21mm f/2.8

Sorry for the long read ! - just really interested & yet have been very happy with the loxia 21 ! I still wish Zeiss would bring out a premium FE / Mirrorless line - perhaps APO 1.8 / 2.0 high performance yet fairly compact primes... one can dream eh! :)

Thanks again & keep up the fantastic work !

fun88官网: I have seen no sample issues with any Zeiss Loxia lenses—highly unusual. However, there is always some variation and no process is perfect.

Lighting with comparisons vs evaluation: I always take this into account and I specifically address field curvature in my MemChu oblique comparison.

All wide angles have some field curvature. Frequently it is pveripheral forward field curvature for wide angle lenses but it can be the reverse, or wave-type field curvature (more common in fast lenses).

I’ll bea addressing these questions above more as I shoot in the field—I’m in the Eastern Sierra as I write this.

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Canon EOS R + Canon RF 85mm f/1.2L

Just mounted the Canon RF 85m f/1.2L on the Canon EOS R. What a high quality flange on both—notably more solid than the L-mount Leica lenses on the Panasonic S1R which have a slight slop (the Panasonic Lumix S PRO 50/1.4 did not, and one other reader reported the same mount slop with Leica SL lenses).

The Canon RF 85/1.2L is huge and clearly built for performance as the priority—none a trace of the Nikon NIKKOR Z compromises. Canon RF lenses (at least the 50/1.2L, 85/1.2L, 28-70/2) feel like serious pro gear. Not one Nikon NIKKOR Z lens can say the same.

If the Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L is any indication, I expect the 85/1.2L to be the world’s best. But what a boat anchor, as in sheer neck-yanking weight. However lovely the images might be, this is a serious chore to heft this thing.

Dr S, this is NOT a rig for you.

Still, Canon should deliver a high megapixel mirrorless camera out, imaging performance should prove out Canon’s distinctive “size and weight be damned, it’s the optical quality” strategy. Which might ultimately sway me to Canon once that body arrives.

I also have on hand the Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L and the Canon RF 35mm f/1.8 Macro STM. The 35/1.8 macro ships without the Canon EW-52 lens hood, which is outrageous because the front lens element is right there out in front, quite exposed.

CLICK TO VIEW: Highly Recommended Canon mirrorless


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Voigtlander FE Nokton 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical Aperture Series: Rodin Courtyard (Sony A7R III)

This aperture series assesses the Voigtlander Nokton 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical at night from f/1.4 through f/9, looking for sharpness and control of secondary color and overall image rendition, including sunstars and point spread function.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Voigtlander FE Nokton 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical Aperture Series: Rodin Courtyard

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/1.4 to f/9. Savor the full resolution images by scrolling around, preferably on an iMac 5K or Apple Pro Display XDR.

If you are OK witih manual focus get this lens, right now! (and please use my link). This is the best 21mm f/1.4 I have ever seen, mirrorless or DSLR.

CLICK TO VIEW: Highly Recommended Voigtlander Lenses for Sony Mirrorless

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f2 @ 4.0 sec, ISO 50; 2019-07-03 21:30:21
[push 0.33 stops, -37 highlights, LACA corrected, +40 shadows, Enhance Details]
Sony A7R III + Voigtlander FE NOKTON 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical
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Reader Comment: Panasonic S1R “re-think my kit and jump head-long to a new system?”

Dr S writes:

Panasonic S1R

Yesterday was my first opportunity to hold the Panasonic S1R at my local brick and mortar. Despite being invested in Sony and Nikon I made the effort to hold and feel the newest kid on the block because of your glowing comments on multi-shot hi-res mode that yields such wonderful images. Would my visit cause me to re-think my kit and jump head-long to a new system?

The answer, after handing, is a resounding no. Why? Weight and size! For my aging bones (and I am not that old) and my chronic back problems, the S1r is a behemoth. I left the heavy DSLRs awhile ago for the smaller mirrorless and my torso has been happy since. You have shown over time that excellent imagery can come from Sony and Nikon mirrorless with the appropriate lenses, this fact being punctuated with your most recent review of the Voigtlander FE 21mm f/1.4.

Sony is not going to stand idly by and not come out with newer bodies with enhanced image capabilities. And if it is not ultra hi-res as Panasonic has produced, it will still be much more than adequate for me. I cannot speak nor presume to speak for others. Indeed, there is a segment that requires Phase One, Fuji, MF for their work.

However there is large segment out there that don't. I am one of them. And in that group (assuming it exists) smaller, extremely capable mirrorless systems will be the ones I gravitate to. As you stated, I hope Sony issues a firmware that enhances resolution. However, if they have the tech to do so, they may incorporate that into a newer model for the sake of sales. Indeed, they need the appearance of being at the top of the mirrorless FF heap.

fun88官网: the size doesn’t bother me that much (the Sony A7R III is too small), but the weight while not a show-stopper for field use given the unrivalled imaging potential, is nonetheless highly unattractive downside for field usage. OTOH, the S1R feels like the best built mirrorless on the market.

Since Sony’s pixel shift is incompetent for field usage, I do not have much that Sony will achieve the results that Panasonic has with the Multi-Shot High-Res mode, but I hope to be pleasantly surprised. But so far, Sony sees computational photography as shitty toy apps in its dilettante Play Memories store.

As to “excellent imagery”—not so much with Sony and Nikon and Canon, as shown in the pixel shift vs single-shot examples I posted yesterday—the context even just on Sony vs itself shows how crappy image quality really is.

See my in-depth review of the Panasonic S1R in L-mount mirrorless.Subscribe now

CLICK TO VIEW: Panasonic S1R and S1 and Lenses



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Voigtlander FE Nokton 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical Aperture Series: Red Electric Cart — should knock your socks off (Sony A7R III)

This aperture series assesses the Voigtlander Nokton 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical at night from f/1.4 through f/4, looking for sharpness and control of secondary color and overall image rendition.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Voigtlander FE Nokton 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical Aperture Series: Red Electric Cart

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/1.4 to f/4. Savor the full resolution images by scrolling around, preferably on an iMac 5K or Apple Pro Display XDR—on those displays they should knock your socks off.

Yes, you want this lens, right now! This is the best 21mm f/1.4 I have ever seen. Well, probably the best 21mm lens of any speed (DSLR or mirrorless) that I have seen.

It’s frustrating as hell not having Multi-Shot HighRes mode or a 100MP sensor. The Sony A7R III is making me chafe with frustration, being fresh off high grade 125MP images from the Panasonic S1R. Where’s my firmware update for the A7R III already, Sony?

CLICK TO VIEW: Highly Recommended Voigtlander

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f1.4 @ 13.0 sec, ISO 50; 2019-07-03 21:16:12
[push 0.45 stops, LACA corrected, +100 shadows, Enhance Details]
Sony A7R III + Voigtlander FE NOKTON 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical
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Shootout: Voigtlander FE Nokton 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical vs Zeiss Loxia 21mm f/2.8: MemChu Oblique

This shootout compares the Voigtlander Nokton 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical to the Zeiss Loxia 21mm f/2.8 on a near-to-far scene from f/1.4 through f/11.

This scene with its oblique viewpoint was chosen to ferret out differences at the edges at far and near areas, in case field curvature might otherwise disadvantage one lens.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Shootout: Voigtlander FE Nokton 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical vs Zeiss Loxia 21mm f/2.8: MemChu Oblique

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/1.4 to f/11, plus crops.

Yes, you do want this lens, right now!

Voigtlander 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical about $1199

1296 | 2592 | 5112
f2.8 @ 1/400 sec, ISO 50; 2019-07-03 19:48:40 [LACA corrected, Enhance Details]
Sony A7R III + Voigtlander NOKTON 21mm F1.4 Aspherical
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Reader Comment: Canon EOS R “has brought the fun and results back”

Brian S writes:

Leica 180mm f/2.8 APO-Elmarit-R

Sensors + focus assist have finally allowed the performance of lenses such as the Leica 180mm f/2.8 APO-Elmarit-R to reach their potential. I bought the lens back in 2009 based on your review.

It's so fun to shoot with now.

I enjoyed with the Canon 5D "Classic" with an alternative focus screen, although the 12MP sensor didn't take advantage of it. When I upgraded to the Canon 5D Mark III the manual focus lens fun ended due to no interchangeable focus screens.

The Canon EOS R has brought the fun and results back. The rendering and bokeh on this lens are so amazing... especially considering how much smaller it is than the Canon 200mm f/2L IS which is the only lens that brings similar results, in my experience.

fun88官网: Yay!

Of course these comments apply to Sony mirrorless and Nikon mirrorless and L-mount mirrorless also.

Mirrorless has made shooting DSLR lenses so much more reliable too—focus can pretty much be guaranteed via magnified Live View and even unmagnified it is probably bettr than today’s horrible DSLR focusing screens.

Regrettably, I had to sell most of my Leica R lenses to raise funds. But I still have the Leica 90mm f/2 APO-Summicron-R ASPH and the Leica 100mm f/2.8 API-Elmarit-R.


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Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness

Or as good as an approximation as the Supreme Court will allow.

Thank you to all those who served in the armed forces, then and now.

Doesn’t look like any fireworks pictures for me—I have the Voigtlander FE 21mm f/1.4 Aspheric, but close-range access like at Shoreline Ampitheatre doesn’t work—no real cameras allowed.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f1.4 @ 1.3 sec, ISO 64; 2019-05-05 19:33:59 [Enhance Details]
NIKON D850 + Zeiss Otus 100mm f/1.4 APO-Sonnar

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Apple Pro Display XDR: the Best Viewing Experience in History for Images?

Print may be favored by some, but not me. It’s my repeatedly-confirmed view that those arguing for prints have seen properly presented images on an iMac 5K—when I test for validitu, the response has always been “haven’t actually seen it”, or similar. I present all my work in Retina resolution on this site—it’s beautiful to behold that way.

The 6K Apple Pro Display XDR delivers a drool-worthy combination of resolution and screen size with true professional grade peformance While the , 6K is what is practical for now.

The Apple Pro Display XDR along with the 2019 Mac Pro form a truly high end professional-grade solution. See the and :

  • Retina 6K Display
  • State-of-the-art calibration and a sophisticated algorithm ensure that you get the highest-quality color possible
  • 32-inch (diagonal) IPS LCD display with oxide TFT technology
  • Resolution: 6016 by 3384 pixels (20.4 megapixels) at 218 pixels per inch, aspect ratio: 16:9
  • Brightness: 1000 nits sustained (full screen), 1600 nits peak
  • Contrast ratio: 1,000,000:1
  • Color: P3 wide color gamut, 10-bit depth for 1.073 billion colors
  • Viewing angle: Superwide angle with high-fidelity color and contrast at 89º left, 89º right, 89º up, 89º down Fully laminated; 1.65% reflectivity
  • 2D backlighting system using 576 full array local dimming zones, Apple-designed timing controller (TCON) chip engineered to precisely control high-speed modulation of both 20.4 million LCD pixels and 576 LEDs in backlight for seamless synchronization
  • True Tone technology with dual ambient light sensor (ALS) design to ensure an accurate viewing experience in any ambient lighting condition
  • Reference modes: HDR Video (P3-ST 2084) HDTV Video (BT.709-BT.1886) NTSC Video (BT.601 SMPTE-C) PAL and SECAM Video (BT.601 EBU) Digital Cinema (P3-DCI) Digital Cinema (P3-D65) Design and Print (P3-D50) Photography (P3-D65) Internet and Web (sRGB)

I doubt I’ll be able to afford one, at US$5999 ($4999 + $1000 for optional Pro Stand)—WOW.

The Apple Pro Display XDR has the same downsides for photographers as does the iMac 5K: it will not be a good choice for evaluating image sharpness, due to too-high pixel density, see: Too-High Pixel Density on 5K and 8K Displays Impedes Image Assessment.

But I sure want one—the Apple iMac 5K has by far been the most pleasurable viewing experience ever for my images. Still, I rely on the NEC PA302W for editing decisions.


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Panasonic S1R / Panasonic S1 Lands with a Thud — Competes poorly Against Medium Format (Updated with Reader Comments)

The Panasonic S1R has arrived with all the desirability of a bloated carp floating in the lake during a bass-fishing tournament.

While I love its Multi-Shot High-Res mode (the best camera feature in years for landscape and similar), few seem to take note. In spite of my in depth reporting on it showing how incredible the image quality is, which is about much more than resolution.

There is so much brand fatigue that no one wants to risk a bet on a new mirrorless platform. Fear is a powerful persuader, and with real legitimacy in this case—fear of investing in a dead end system—Sony has won the mirrorless game as I suggested several years ago given the CaNikon sloth.

Sony presumably will presumably drive the fish truck to the lake soon, and dump several kinds of trophy bass in.

Panasonic S1R blunders into medium format pricing territory, pricing is about the same as 50 megapixel medium format, and with a path to 100 megapixels (Fujifilm medium format). So the lenses carry forward to more and better, including when 100MP costs half what it does now.

I don't have access to sales figures, but I’d be very interested in knowing how many S1R camera bodies have sold versus Nikon Z7 / Canon EOS R / Sony A7R III. Note the aggressive rebates by Canon, Nikon, Sony, and still no rebates for the S1R, aside from a modest trade-in program.

CLICK TO VIEW: Panasonic S1R System and Recommended Lenses

CLICK TO VIEW: Medium Format at 35mm Prices

Gordon S writes:

I am not sure about the market but your reports on Hi-rez pushed me over the edge - I got a Panasonic S1R a few months ago when the SanJose camera had a trade in event ( plus the extra 400 bucks for trade in). Could not be happier and recently got the Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH ( Sold off my Leica Sl and 24-90). I love it ! Hoping to get the Leica 35mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH but it seems to made of “unobtainium” :) Typical Leica BS - hard to make, blah blah blah.

Keep up the great work - While the masses are not always you have made lifetime supporters of your work!

fun88官网: the 35/2 APO should be very nice, but I've been waiting for a loaner, like everyone else.

A big thank you to everyone who uses links on my site to buy from B&H Photo.


Upgrade the memory of your 2018 Mac mini up to 64GB

Cineo Matchbox—a Portable Ultra High Quality Light Source with Optional Battery + new Cineo Lightblade

See Cineo Matchbox: Bought 3 of them for my Mercedes Sprinter Photography Adventure Van, Really Right Stuff BH-25 Attaches Them Almost Anywhere.

Cineo Matchbox LED remote phosphor lighting

It’s on sale, it’s discontinued, I have six of them—I adore the light quality. Three are installed in .

The one catch for battery usage is the overpriced $99 bracket which is needed to attach a Sony NPF battery—it ought to be included. But with that bracket, I can carry the Matchbox in the field, which I used for subtle fill light in this stitched image. Don’t forget batteries.

But I now have a new interest in a newer Cineo offering, more on that below.

CLICK TO VIEW: Cineo Matchbox stuff

Below, this image used the Cineo Matchbox for subtle fill light. The beauty of the Matchbox is in its field portability and battery powered operation and 1% to 100% continuously variable flicker-free light that nearly matches sunlight.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
Old Stump View To Mt Conness at Sunset
f1.8 @ 1/4 sec, ISO 31; 2017-11-08 17:58:07 [focus stack 6 frames]
NIKON D850 + Sigma 14mm f/1.8 DG HSM Art

The new Cineo Lightblade

I wrote to Cineo asking for a demo unit of their new Cineo Lightblade. It looks like something I could really use for for my office and perhaps for my van—I always seem to have too little light when I want it. I have some hope of being able to evaluate one:

Let me talk to the powers that be on my side. Not sure if you heard the news, NBCUniversal acquired Cineo Lighting. Let me see what we can do as we have a lot of changes and process we are managing. I will follow up with you.

Hopefully the new process will sort itself out and get me a Lightblade to evaluate.

Cineo Lightblade remote phosphor lights in 1 or 2 or 4 blade configurations, 2 feet or 4 feet long
Lloyd’s Sony Mirrorless Wishlist
Hand-picked items for Sony.

Reader Comment: “Glad to hear you are back in the thick of things”

James K writes:

You must be fully recovered from your recent crashes if you are carrying the Otus 28mmm in the field.

...Glad to hear you are back in the thick of things. You will have lots of work to do this fall.

fun88官网: I make a point of NOT carrying the Otus 28 very far—it’s just too bulky and heavy. So sad that Zeiss targets video only now, with huge and heavy lenses when f/2 would do great with superior performance and are more field usability.

For the past few days, I’m feeling great again! I rode 81 miles /3000 calories yesterday and felt great, stronger at the end than when I started, based on years of experience a sure sign that my body is working again and ready to accept severe training loads (I’d ride 3+ hours day ~2200 calories @ ~208 watts if time allowed). Still, my strength has returned only in the past week or so. The turnaround started in mid June, after an back in late March and mid April. The cure of antibiotics was worse than the disease (UTI and then prostatis).

For UTI and prostatitis I have learned something: try to —it worked for me after the , which I completed in record-slow time (for me). But I missed 5 other double centuries this year—too weak even for my baseline training rides.

I advise extreme prejudice against antibiotic use unless absolutely necessary. Aside from destroying the (the “2nd brain”), antibiotics can affect muscles and tendons and nerves and just about everything.

I must be sensitive to antibiotics: was my first really bad experience, causing peripheral neuropathy that took two years to recover from. This go-round, I had physical and cognitive effects that hit me hard in April/May both physically and cognitively. The brain part gave me some deja vu with respect to along with ADD* for a few weeks (worse than after my concussion!), with one scary day of a severe inability to concentrate that I have never before experienced. I hope to not have to take antibiotics ever again. For myself, I consider antibiotics the most dangerous types of drugs out there in commonplace usage.

* Atypical Attention Deficit Hypoactivity disorder (not "hyper").

From my Dec 30 bike crash, two root canals preceded 6 crowns to fix cracked or broken teeth. A root canal on a molar wasn’t bad, but a root canal on a front tooth is not an experience I care to repeat. For a few weeks more, I have 4 plastic temporary crowns on the four front teeth and the durable ones get installed later in July. Even the plastic onese look terrific compared to the hillbilly broken front tooth 'look'. I'm deferring the wisdom teeth extraction until 2020—I’ve had my fill of dentistry, even if expertly done! And my bank account is drained.

My gratitude to all my subscribers who have stuck with me the past 15 months. And hopefully the foregoing will spare at least one person some damage.

Voigtlander FE Nokton 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical for Sony Mirrorless

See my Mac wish list.

On the way for testing is the Voigtlander Nokton 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical.

Voigtlander FE Nokton 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical
  • E-Mount Lens/Full-Frame Format
  • Aperture Range: f/1.4 to f/16
  • 2 Aspherical Elements
  • 3 Partial Dispersion Elements
  • Floating Elements System
  • Manual Focus Design
  • Minimum Focusing Distance: 9.8"
  • Manual Aperture Ring Can Be De-Clicked
  • 12-Blade Diaphragm
  • Contacts Transfer Exif Data

The Voigtlander FE Nokton 21mm f/1.4 Aspherical looks to be an all-new design for Sony mirrorless from what I can tell. If so, it might fill an interesting slot.

Most of the Voigtlander FE wide angles have been adapted rangefinder designs and suffer accordingly in the outer zones, but this 21mm might be quite good and it is an alternative to the excellent but two stops slower Zeiss Loxia 21mm f/2.8—I’ll see soon enough how it shakes out. The new designs like the 65mm and 110m are outstanding.

CLICK TO VIEW: Voigtlander Nokton Lenses for Sony FE

Protect Your Phone
NuGard KX Case for iPhones and iPads.
Outstanding protection against drops and impact!
Plus, excellent grip for wet hands, cycling, etc.

Got a School Age Kid, or Just Want a Mac for Handy Access Where You Want It?

See my Mac wish list.

Got a school age kid, or just want a Mac for stuff, one for handy email and web access in the kitchen or study or even in your , or similar?

Score a deal on an iMac 5K or iMac 4K—awesome screen, plenth of performance, add when and if needed or a later.

These Macs are not the very fastest, but with a bit more memory they’d be just fine for most photographers. They’re really fast for everyday stuff, way faster than necessary.

And the 4K and 5K screens are just awesome for images—PC users take note of how crappy most PC displays are—these are terrific displays with a free computer included!

Smile, an save a ton of money with these deals!

CLICK TO VIEW: Terrific Value Macs


Upgrade the memory of your 2018 Mac mini up to 64GB

Shootout: Panasonic Lumix S PRO 70-200mm f/4 OIS vs Panasonic Lumix S PRO 24-105mm f/4 OIS @ ~74mm: Painted Rock

Get Panasonic S1R at B&H Photo.

This page looks at performance of the Panasonic Lumix S PRO 70-200mm f/4 OIS versus the Panasonic Lumix S PRO 24-105mm f/4 OIS near 70mm on a highly detailed 3D target at relatively close distance from f/4 through f/11.

In fun88官网 L-Mount Mirrorless:

Shootout: Panasonic Lumix S PRO 70-200mm f/4 OIS vs Panasonic Lumix S PRO 24-105mm f/4 OIS @ ~74mm: Painted Rock

Presented at up to 125 megapixels (shot in 187MP Multi-Shot High-Res mode from f/4 through f/11, with crops.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f5.6 @ 1/60 sec Multi-Shot HighRes, ISO 50; 2019-05-31 14:38:14
[location “Lundy Canyon”, altitude 7300 ft / 2225 m, 60°F / 15°C, distortion corrected, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
Panasonic S1R + Panasonic Lumix S PRO 70-200mm f/4 OIS @ 73mm
OWC Thunderbolt 3 Dock
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USB 3 • USB-C
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5K and 4K display support plus Mini Display Port
Analog sound in/out and Optical sound out

Works on any Mac with Thunderbolt 3

Reader Comment: How Much Resolution is Enough?

Chris R writes:

Good work with the recent Zeiss Otus images along with some of your other favorites too, loving all the recent Zeiss lens tests you doing on the Panasonic S1R, it’s certainly giving you some resolution to play with.

I’m really pleased to see you shooting the likes of the Zeiss Milvus 135mm f/2 with the S1R also, just shows how damn good it is and more than assures me that it will never let me down quality wise, not on my mediocre Canon 5DM4 sensor!

But out of all of it, Zeiss seem to have the upper hand on the colour fidelity compared to the likes of Sigma etc, colours just seem richer, I’ve seen other online testers and images can sometimes look cold, magenta or both, Canon are particularly cool with a pinkish look to their lenses, but think we’ve spoken of this previously.

But I ask at the end of the day, how much resolution his enough for real world everyday publications, indeed an A4 front cover only needs a 24mb file and I often get asked to just supply images for web and press release at around 11 MB, I know you love the detail along with the resolution for landscapes which is key, but realistically if you were using imaging on a Billboard, Rip software generally takes an image of 50% up to size.

Yes, I know the extra resolution is handy for cropping if needed and gives you more freedom and less restrictions, but as iv’e said, for most commercial applications I maybe using only about 70% of my 5Dmk4’s full resolution and picture libraries require around a 50mb file minimum.

fun88官网: heck, iPhone images look good on billboards from distance! If the job is magazines, I recommend using 42/45/47 megapixels at least, if only to avoid digital artifacts like moiré and color aliasing and staircasing and noise. It’s about far more than resolution, as the Panasonic S1R so persuasively demonstrates with its Multi-Shot High-Res mode.

The golden age of photography is upon us, but on top of that, the golden age of high visual impact photo-realistic visual immersion is coming soon to a wall near you. 8K displays (7680 X 4320) are not far off, and the new .

Print is irrelevant to me and to most camera users these days. While nothing beats a strong composition, presbyopia means that 8 X 10 magazines are increasingly not enjoyable—National geographic is just too damn small. Even 11 X 14 sucks, since type size is apparently for those under the age of 40. It will only get worse, and close-up glasses don’t really solve the core issue.

I love seeing details in my images that I didn’t even notice firsthand. I love photorealism, I love the unexpected find in an image, and I can’t stand mushy details, as I am so attuned and attentive to the world out there. Faces too interest me that way, well just about everything. Just the way I am wired.

I for one intend to shoot for future enjoyment with 10K (up to 10240 X 6820) an intermediate goal, and 16K (15360 X 8460) perhaps 5-8 years out. That’s my target as I shoot here in 2019. For now, the iMac 5K is the best thing going for viewing, excepting the coming Apple Pro Display XDR.

See also: Photographic Film Really Was Not Much of a Performer.

Eric B writes:

Something you said today alarmed me though, “print is irrelevant to me and to most photographers.”

In my world, here in the Portland, Oregon area, my circle of photographic friends do not consider an image to be finished until it is on paper. As you know there are many wonderful papers available to us now and excellent printers. I do not sit at my computer all day and try to use my phone less. My home and that of most of my friends is adorned with prints, some are mine, some are by colleagues. I am fortunate to have picture molding in my home and can change out images relatively easily with no holes in the wall.

I am well aware that people print less. My monthly group now has more people projecting images than showing prints but often there’s some problem with the projector or computer, delaying the showing; one needs to reduce the ambient lighting, and the images frequently look just awful, even decent ones

With projected images, one is limited to a few moments of viewing, viewing is at a distance, details are not often visible, and a critique is all but impossible. When we show prints, one can linger over a nice one, look at it carefully and closely; critiques have meaning.

I’m not giving up the print, I hope many others agree. I often wonder why we worry about high resolution cameras when the images will be seen only at significantly lower resolution on a screen, or horrors, a phone.

fun88官网: prints will endure of course, and I do enjoy some large prints in my small home—but I have nowhere to store/swap them, nor the money, time or inclination to do so. Each to his own, as it ought to be.

The operative word is "most", as in probably 99% of people shooting a real camera, even ignoring camera phones, which are used for more than 99% of the images made today. Eric’s own words capture that: “my circle of photographic friends...” is surely a tiny circle compared to the millions of people buying cameras today. It’s just not a thing that people make prints anymore, let alone high quality ones or large sizes. I do, my readers most likely do, but I don’t plan to print much anymore, maybe never again. It’s a cost and space issue, and the accumulation of crap over time as I age along with a lousy user experience (unpack a print from storage to view it? Ugghhh).

Images are worthless if they cannot be viewed. There is a ton of pleasure in viewing images which are far too numerous to print and display. There is a ton of pleasure in a photo realistic viewing experience, which prints do not do as well as the best electronic medium already does.

my circle of photographic friends do not consider an image to be finished until it is on paper”: Isn’t this at least a personal preference, if not an outright conceit which has no factual or logical basis? Tradition is not an argument. Preferences are not an argument.

If viewing images electronically looks bad, that's bad execution and/or bad technology. Bad prints look bad also! Neither is a fact of reality or a constant. The dynamic range of prints is inherently inferior to to a good display, because prints are a reflective medium (backlit 'chrome' type prints could improve upon that), while displays are a transmissive medium. I know that some new print techniques on metal and such and/or ultra high gloss paper can be eye popping, but they still cannot compete on dynamic range, and in any home environment like mine, there are always reflections that further diminish print viewing. Still, I do like my coated canvas prints. But a 10K display at six feet wide would be awesomely better and can deal with ambient light by adjusting color and brightness.

I like my large prints (six feet wide preferred, but at least 3 feet wide). IMO, prints under 3 feet wide suffer from “ageism”—smaller ones are a physical hassle (presbyopia) to view for me—I am not interested in reading glasses for enjoying a print in my house, so nothing less than 3 feet will do. Nor do I have the money to make large high quality canvas prints I prefer!

As for detail, I’ll put the visual impact of an iMac 5K up against any similar-size print. The fact is that the human eye responds primarily to contrast, and the iMac 5K kicks the crap out of prints for that. The 32-inch Apple Pro Display XDR arrives this fall, and it will surely be the finest viewing experience ever seen, particularly for black and white and its larger size is just about perfect for general viewing. It offers 6016 X 3384 pixels (20MP) at 218 DPI and I challenge anyone but the youngest people with 20/20 vision to care about higher DPI—the eye responds to contrast down the pixel level on such a display, which a print simply cannot compete with, end of story.

Then there is damage—having kids, all my prints in the hallway have dings.

Of course I understand that physical media have appeal and always will—me too. But that has a limited role to play.

Point is, we will have 8K/10K/16K displays up to 8 feet wide or larger, with 16K within a decade. The possibilities for viewing my images when I want at up to huge sizes I could never print well with full detail and contrast will make prints look like dusty artifacts.

Meanwhile, the iMac 5K is a terrific display that comes with a free computer.

Emil B writes:

Your points about the overall decrease in need for photographic prints and increase in viewing images on a monitor are well taken.

As a photorealist painter, a few years back I have given up on using photographic prints as references for my painting and have switched to the use of an iPad.

The only time I resort to printing is if a gallery requests to view my print portfolio. At a local society of artists I exhibit along with photographers who continue to show prints as their end product. In world class galleries in San Francisco and Carmel photographic prints continue to be offered for sale. Cultural, technological and economic factors seem to have dramatically reduced interest in purchases of both photographic prints and paintings.

In view of your statement about the irrelevance of prints, how do see the future of photography as a fine art?

fun88官网: the medium does not take away the art, at least for photography. That would confuse vision and persuasion and insight of the artist with the means of presentation.

While certain photographers have for historical reasons become associated with the physical aspects of their work (e.g., Ansel Adams lengendary printing skills), that is not an essential attribute of a fine composition. I was unimpressed (actually disapponted) with Adam's prints I saw in the Adams family house when I visited— an iMac 5K with the contrast and tonal range that Adams could ony dream about woud be better—maybe his work can be retargeted for modern digital displays? Displays will only get larger/better with more pixels for more photorealism? See iMac 5K for Stunning Black and White Images.

Unlike inherently 3D art (e.g. sculpture), photography is 3D rendered as 2D with perceptual tricks to imply 3D. The medium matters little for photography except insofar as it adds some particular characteristic unobtainable otherwise (e.g., platinum printing) or some other sense like touch or smell or hearing—but I don’t touch or smell or hear my prints, and most everyone smothers prints under glass (adding a veil if not outright reflections). The wonderful physically sensual texture of a very fine rag paper is... not touchable upon display! Bastions of art (museums and such) disallow direct contact. Of what merit then is anything but the presentation that best persuades the visual cortex?


Upgrade the memory of your 2018 Mac mini up to 64GB

Recommended: Medium Format Magazine

I write for —great articles and highly recommended.

If you’re shooting medium format, there is a lot of perspective to read with no other publication like it out there. ASAP!

                 
Medium Format Magazine Covers

Deals Updated Daily at B&H Photo

Reader Comment: Lens Adaptability, Lens Adapters

The golden age of photography is upon us, which includes the golden age of lenses. Optical quality has never been better—along with the grunt to make it even better, computational photography.

Chris R writes:

Here’s another observation, in the not so distant future, regardless of which system you use, there will be an adapter for just about every system so that any third party lens, or indeed, camera system will be universally adaptable to any lens so it won’t be as much of an issue which system you settle for.

fun88官网: sort of, but not so much at a practical matter, for many reasons.

I do go to the trouble of adapting lenses in special cases, such as shooting Zeiss DSLR lenses in Multi-Shot High-Res mode, or F-mount lenses on the Nikon Z7 or Canon EF lenses on the Canon EOS R, but it’s far from ideal from a handling perspective (and no EXIF either).

Flange focal distance

First, the flange focal distance governs whether a lens adapter can be inserted between a lens and the camera. For example, the 16m flange focal distance of the Nikon Z7 lets (in priniciple) all other mirrorless and DSLR and rangefinder lenses mount via a lens adapter.

That’s because the flange focal distance of other camera present camera systems range are 18mm or greater, thus allowing at least a 2mm gap for an adapter to be inserted between lens and camera. While 2mm is iffy for support/stability reasons, it already exists for Nikon DSLR lenses (46.5mm FFO) to Canon DSLR (44.0mm FFO). Thi

The foregoing is why just about any lens can be mounted on the Nikon Z7, but Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses cannot be adapted to any other system, at least not without inserting additional optics (yuck) or dubious into-camera-throat designs.

Fujifilm lens mount schematic: implies 3.1mm thick sensor cover glass, 26.7mm flange focal distance

Electronics

Most lenses these days lack an aperture ring, so a lens adapter has to, at the least, provide electronic translation from the camera to the lens for aperture control. And when it comes to autofocus support, good luck with many adapters—poor AF performance.

Lens support

Camera brand X does not support lens correction of random Camera brand y lenses—so distortion correction and chromatic correction and vignetting correction are all off while shooting. This is sometimes OK, but sometimes a serious problem in that framing becomes difficult for a lens with significant distortion. Worse, most raw convertes including ACR do not provide any selectable lens profile support for Lens Y on Camera X, recognizing the len properly only when shot natively.

Physical

Many lenses are too heavy and too awkward to be practical and increase the risk of damage to both lens and camera flange (bumps, sheer weight). There are also two additional mounting surfaces which have significant risk of having planarity deviations versus a single mounting interface of a native lens.

Optics and sensor cover glass

The variations in sensor cover glass* thickness can be small to large, but high performance lenses can be very sensitive off-axis to differences. Thus performance of a lens designed for 0.8mm thick Leica M sensors is most often degraded massively on mirrorless—no exceptions so far—see MTF on Mirrorless Cameras of the Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon for the huge losses (although it can offer stunning performance by f/8).

* Total effective filter stack thickness includes the sensor cover glass and its index of refraction, plus additional layers such as an IR-blocking layer.

Differing sensor cover glass thickness vs design parameters causes light rays to diverge inappropriately, killing performance

Upgrade Your Mac Memory
At much lower cost than Apple, with more options.
Lloyd recommends 64GB for iMac or Mac Pro for photography/videography.

Expert Advice from Lloyd at a Bargain Price via WhenHub.com — Limited Time Offer

brings together experts with those needing the expertise.

For a limited time, I am offering my at a greatly reduced rate for first-time consulting clients versus my usual $280 first-hour fee, because I want to try the WhenHub experience for usefulness to me [20% off for continuing clients e.g., $160/hour].

Like a doctor, my fee is not so much about time as the deep reservoir of experience so that can cut right to the key issues and solve them for you, saving you both time and money and mistakes, which are far more expensive.

The second reason for this offer is that I want to accumulate some WHEN crypto tokens. And that’s the catch: you do have to pay me in WHEN token, which can be bought easily at WhenHub.com. No minimum time of engagement.


Getting started

The interaction is via an app on your phone or table, with video/sound.

  1. Purchase some WHEN tokens.
  2. Contact lloyd in advance* so I can alter the pricing appropriately, prior to our connection.

* WhenHub.com does not allow me (at least not yet) to set pricing differently for different areas of expertise,

Areas of expertise

Choose any of these areas, or anything you'd like, presumably stuff you’ve read in my blog over the years.

$70/hour for up to first hour (75% off). Price in dollars below means the equivalent WHEN tokens at time of engagement.

  • Photography: which system to choose, lenses, cameras, technique, post-processing, etc. Maybe you want to discuss a whole system choice, or maybe just which 85mm lens—anything.
  • Computers for photographers: model, memory, CPU, GPU, to optimize Photoshop or Lightroom.
  • Data organization, backup, , fault-tolerance, best practices for this and more. Oriented towards those who don’t want to ever lose their Stuff at home/office or traveling.
  • Considerations in features and design, including state of the battery/electrical.
  • Where/when to shoot in Yosemite or the White Mountains, what to wear/take/best time, etc.
  • — my perspective and findings based on my own journey might help you or add hope! [always confer with your doctor, I do NOT give medical advice]. Even a little perspective might help you! Nominal fee of $10/hour for discussion up to an hour, $50/hour thereafter. I’m doing this to help others, not to make any meaningful money, that’s so the first hour is cheap.
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Off Topic: Three Top Notch Professionals to Help Your Body Health and Cycling Performance

Here are three individuals that I am very impressed with, and highly recommend.

Imagine your body working at its best!

3D Bike Fit

Kevin Bailey, 3DBikeFit.com (San Francisco)

Kevin at 3DBikeFit.com (see ) gets bike fitting right, with the most meticulous attention to detail I’ve seen—the very best. Kevin is the reason I can ride double centuries without pain. I also ride a , the best I have ever found (and I have half a dozen other ones in a box!).

Kevin also makes which are awesome—I rode a double century two days after he made my pair, with zero issues—that’s amazing, and a proper footbed means better power transfer and no pain.

 

 

 

 

 

Rikki Johansen

Dr. Rikki Johanseen CCSP, DACBSP, DACBR (Palo Alto, CA)

Also, certified triathlon coach and a USA Cycling, Level II certified cycling coach.

and .

When I have any injury or problem with my body (muscular, tendon, left/right imbalance, and related pains or similar injuries), I go see Rikke first because she knows how to fix it, and fix it quickly—including casese that bothered me for weeks that improve immediately.

Rikki knows hers stuff and is not any ordinary “crack your back” chiropracter; she’s a cut way above that. She likes to fix things in one visit if possible (for me, that has been true with most injuries!).

I don’t bother going to doctors for sports injuries and similar anymore because they really don’t know how to fix things (expensive brief visits just result in a PT referral)! Unless it’s a broken bone or torn ligament or other true medical surgery-type issue, go so Rikke first.

 

 

 


Dee Sickles, MMT, LMT

Dee Sickles, MMT, LMT (Flagstaff, AZ)

See .

There is massage, there is medical massage, and then there are gifted hands with medical massage. If you have a seemingly intractable physical issue that doctors say is “impossible” to fix without surgery, think again, because what do you have to lose? All feedback from people I’ve recommended Dee to has been enthusiastic.

In 2018, after my 25 mph crash into an embankment with moderate-to-severe , a twisted spine and torso and mashed-in ribs were not going to go away on their own, but . I’ve had both injuries and massage before but never fixes like that. Problems solved.

Dee’s uncanny ability to zero in on the issue was startling to me. Pains I had for weeks after my crash were solved for good.

Reader comments below

anon writes:

I can attest to the importance of having a good massage therapist.

This past month, I was driven to near madness by mysterious tension headaches, neck discomfort and weird sensations. I attributed it all to job stress and started worrying if I'd be able to continue to work or even worse, that I had a serious health condition. Turns out it was just bad posture.

After a visit to a skilled massage therapist with myoskeletal experience, I learned I had Upper Cross Syndrome- pairs of weak and tense muscle groups caused by years of texting on a cellphone and hunched office work. After 3 hours of intense back and neck work my symptoms were 70%+ alleviated, permanently. Massage therapy saved my job, and sanity.

fun88官网: nice outcome.

Mark N writes:

Thank you very much for your post about the products at 3DBikeFit. I am interested in their bike seat and would like to know which seat you use. Either the Throne GT or RS. It appears we have a similar body habitus.

fun88官网: great to hear it’s useful—such stuff is why I bother—hoping someone can profit from sharing my experience. I ride the 3DBikeFit “Throne GT” saddle. As per Kevin Bailey of 3DBikeFit.com:

Lloyd has the , and now we have another revised new version of it with a larger cut out. It’s same foam but front has longer channel. Looks better is more refined and has longer rails and new atoms base where cover raps under top base at front and back.

OWC Thunderbolt 3 Dock
Ideal for any Mac with Thunderbolt 3


Dual Thunderbolt 3 ports
USB 3 • USB-C
Gigabit Ethernet
5K and 4K display support plus Mini Display Port
Analog sound in/out and Optical sound out

Works on any Mac with Thunderbolt 3

Life Gives the Tests Before the Lessons

So many years have passed.

I am emjoying perspective, but it is bittersweet since life gives the tests before the lessons. And I keep learning things I wish I had learned 36 years ago.

My first experience with Yosemite was on the way to Stanford. It was quite an eye opener, even having climbed a dozen Colorado 14ers as a teen.

I graduated 10 years late due to several startups along the way... so much hard work so many years and a degree did not make me smart enough to retain the money—2008 had other ideas. Onward! And I have a much better tripod.

1200 | 2400 | 3912
Degree
Zeiss Loxia for Sony Mirrorless
$1349 SAVE $150 = 10.0% ZEISS 21mm f/2.8 Loxia in Lenses: Mirrorless
$1169 SAVE $130 = 10.0% ZEISS 25mm f/2.4 Loxia in Lenses: Mirrorless
$1169 SAVE $130 = 10.0% ZEISS 35mm f/2 Loxia in Lenses: Mirrorless
$854 SAVE $95 = 10.0% ZEISS 50mm f/2 Loxia in Lenses: Mirrorless
$1259 SAVE $140 = 10.0% ZEISS 85mm f/2.4 Loxia in Lenses: Mirrorless

Zeiss ZF.2 25mm f/2.8 Distagon Aperture Series: Dead Pines in Defunct Beaver Pond

An “oldy but goody”? The Zeiss ZF.2 25mm f/2.8 Distagon is no longer made, but has appealing qualities. I wondered how it might hold up to the 187 megapixel challenge.

This aperture series looks at imaging performance of the Zeiss ZF.2 25mm f/2.8 Distagon 187MP Multi-Shot High-Res mode shot on the Panasonic S1R. Sharpness and field curvature are the key areas of interest.

Zeiss Milvus 15mm f/2.8 Aperture Series: Dead Pines in Defunct Beaver Pond

Images presented at up to 93 megapixels in color, plus a 3-frame focus stack at f/8 in color and B&W.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f8 @ 1/100 sec Multi-Shot HighRes, ISO 50; 2019-05-30 11:00:49
[location “Lundy Canyon”, altitude 8100 ft / 2469 m, 65°F / 18°C, focus stack 3 frames, LACA corrected]
Panasonic S1R + Zeiss 25mm f/2.8 Distagon

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Zeiss Milvus 15mm f/2.8 Aperture Series: Dead Pines in Defunct Beaver Pond

This series looks at imaging performance of the Zeiss Milvus 15mm f/2.8 in 187MP Multi-Shot High-Res mode shot on the Panasonic S1R. Sharpness and field curvature are the key areas of interest.

The discussion should be extraordinarily helpful for anyone looking to get the best from the Zeiss Milvus 15mm f/2.8 Distagon shooting for total sharpness.

Zeiss Milvus 15mm f/2.8 Aperture Series: Dead Pines in Defunct Beaver Pond

Images presented at up to 93 megapixels in color, plus a 3-frame focus stack at f/8 in color and B&W.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f8 @ 1/125 sec, ISO 50; 2019-05-30 11:48:34
[location “Lundy Canyon”, altitude 8100 ft / 2469 m, 60°F / 15°C, focus stack 3 frames, LACA corrected]
Panasonic S1R + Zeiss 15mm f/2.8 Distagon

Zeiss Otus 100mm f/1.4 APO-Sonnar Aperture Series: Painted Rock (Multi-Shot High-Res Mode, Focus Shift)

This series looks at the sharpness of the Zeiss Otus 100mm f/1.4 APO-Sonnar at medium distance in 187 megapixel Multi-Shot High-Res mode, evaluating focus shift in the process. It shows how a focus shift can work out to advantage in the right circumstances by good luck. But it can go the other way too—a loss of sharpness by displacing the zone of sharpness out of its ideal position.

Zeiss Otus 100mm f/1.4 APO-Sonnar about $4990

Here, I got lucky, and what had been puzzling me suddenly became clear. This single evaluation is is worth the entire subscription price of fun88官网 Zeiss DLSR Lenses by itself, at least if you want top results from the Otus 100/1.4 regardless of which camera is used—I figure if it puzzled me, it’s not going to be obvious to most. It makes no sense to buy a $4990 lens and then get less than it can deliver.

Zeiss Otus 100mm f/1.4 APO-Sonnar Aperture Series: Painted Rock

Images at up to the full capture resolution of 187 megapixels, so that the full imaging performance can be scrutinized at a ridiculously demanding resolution. Plus crops.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f8 @ 1/160 sec Multi-Shot HighRes, ISO 50; 2019-05-31 15:16:00
[location “Lundy Canyon”, altitude 7300 ft / 2225 m, 65°F / 18°C, LACA corrected, Enhance Details]
Panasonic S1R + Zeiss Otus 100mm f/1.4 APO-Sonnar

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Zeiss Otus 100mm f/1.4 APO-Sonnar: Focus Shift

Update June 29: I've added some tips and discussion.

Cognitive commitments affect us all and I am no exception, though I push back pretty hard on my own assumptions, a habit developed by years of coding and for the past decade, gear testing.

Having tested all previous Zeiss Otus lenses in depth and finding them remarkably excellent in being free of focus shift in central areas (edges do have some), my initial tests of the Zeiss Otus 100mm f/1.4 APO-Sonnar were not up to snuff in sniffing out focus shift.

Zeiss Otus 100mm f/1.4 APO-Sonnar about $4990

It was 187MP Multi-Shot High-Res mode that had me scratching my head in puzzlement, as focus shift altered more than one field series to a degree not to my liking. I have now rectified that oversight with proofs on the Nikon D850 (only 45 megapixels).

In fun88官网 Zeiss:

Zeiss Otus 100mm f/1.4 APO-Sonnar: Focus Shift

I’ll be following up with a more interesting field example.

f1.4 @ 1/1600 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-28 17:42:18
NIKON D850 + Zeiss Otus 100mm f/1.4 APO-Sonnar

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Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL Aperture Series: Painted Rock (Panasonic S1R Multi-Shot High-Res Mode)

Get L-Mount lenses at B&H Photo.Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL about $4750

This aperture series looks at imaging performance from f/2 through f/11 on the Panasonic S1R in Multi-Shot High-Res mode. It was shot before understanding the unstable focus behavior, but is still impressive nonetheless.

In fun88官网 L-Mount Mirrorless:

Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL Aperture Series: Painted Rock

Images at up to 125 megapixels. The imaging quality is spectacular.

What an incredible waste of effort to shoot at 24 megapixels or even 47 megapixels—check out the stunning quality of the 47MP image as downsampled from the 187MP capture with its total freedom from all digital artifacts and near-zero noise. That kind of image qualitiy cannot even be approached with the best 35mm cameras today, it’s in a league by itself.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f4 @ 1/200 sec Multi-Shot HighRes, ISO 50; 2019-05-31 14:27:26
[location “Lundy Canyon”, altitude 7300 ft / 2225 m, 60°F / 15°C, distortion corrected, USM{8,50,0}, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
Panasonic S1R + Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH

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Leica 90mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL Aperture Series: Painted Rock (Focus Stacked, Panasonic S1R Multi-Shot High-Res Mode)

Get L-Mount lenses at B&H Photo.Leica 90mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL about $5150

This aperture series looks at imaging performance from f/2 through f/8 on the Panasonic S1R in Multi-Shot High-Res mode.

I had shot this scene two ways: one series focused on the eye and the other on the leading edge of the rock, doing so because I knew that the focus instability problem would damage sharpness across the series; I thought that one series might be usable.

In total, neither series was satisfactory for all apertures. Later, I decided to make lemonade out of two lemon series: for each aperture, I used focus stacking, tedious but well worth the results—the series speaks for itself as stunningly high in detail, even at f/2.

In fun88官网 L-Mount Mirrorless:

Leica 90mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL Aperture Series: Painted Rock

Images at up to 125 megapixels plus crops. The imaging quality is spectacular.

What an incredible waste of effort to shoot at 24 megapixels or even 47 megapixels—check out the stunning quality of the 47MP image as downsampled from the 187MP capture with its total freedom from all digital artifacts and near-zero noise. That kind of image qualitiy cannot even be approached with the best 35mm cameras today, it’s in a league by itself.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f2.8 @ 1/400 sec, ISO 50; 2019-05-31 14:46:55
[location “Lundy Canyon”, altitude 7300 ft / 2225 m, 60°F / 15°C, distortion corrected, USM{8,50,0}, LACA corrected, focus stack 2 frames]
Panasonic S1R + Leica 90mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH
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Zeiss Otus 28mm f/1.4 APO-Distagon Aperture Series: Painted Rock (Panasonic S1R, Multi-Shot High-Res Mode)

Get Zeiss Otus at B&H Photo.

The series is an ultimate test, with up to 125 megapixel images from f/1.4 through f/8 on a 3D target at close-medium range, showing off depth of field behavior and sharpness as well as outer-zone bokeh and secondary color.

In fun88官网 Zeiss DSLR Lenses:

Zeiss Otus 28mm f/1.4 APO-Distagon Aperture Series: Painted Rock

Includes images up to 125 megapixels from f/1.4 to f/8, plus crops.

Shot on the Panasonic S1R in 187MP Multi-Shot High-Res mode. The Otus 28/1.4 was mounted on the Panasonic S1R using the Novoflex Nikon F Lens to Leica SL/T Camera Body Lens Adapter.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f4 @ 1/250 sec Multi-Shot HighRes, ISO 50; 2019-05-31 15:58:11
[location “Lundy Canyon”, altitude 7300 ft / 2225 m, 60°F / 15°C, LACA corrected, Enhance Details]
Panasonic S1R + Zeiss Otus 28mm f/1.4 APO-Distagon

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Computational Photography: PhaseOne Introduces Automated Frame Averaging

Busy day, and so I am behind, but I have a new crown for the disintegrated molar.

Kudos to PhaseOne. I’ve alluded to multi-frame averaging for dynamic range purposes in the past, this includes the possibility of varying exposures across frames. This is another variant.

It is so obvious that I just have to shake my head and wonder WTF Sony/Canon/Nikon are doing—not going full bore on features like this—not going at all—while at least the Panasonic S1R style Multi-Shot High-Res mode is a killer feature (in itself a form of frame averaging with a resolution bonus). Most all cameras today are like iPhones with very few apps burned into firmware and you'd better like it that way.

It looks like PhaseOne has done it right.

Automated Frame Averaging allows for long exposures (e.g. several minutes long) in bright daylight without the use of strong ND filters, reduces (the already very low level of) noise in shadows, and adds interesting aesthetic options to the toolkit of the photographer. It works on any kind of body or camera that the IQ4 can mount to including the world’s only modern medium format SLR, the Phase One XF, and tech cameras such as the Arca Swiss RMD3Di and Cambo Wide RS series. Best of all it’s incredibly simple to use and generates, in-camera, a standard raw file.

Improved Shadow Flexibility in Challenging Scenes: The Phase One IQ4 150mp full-frame-645 sensor has the most dynamic range of any camera available today, but some scenes are so challenging that even the IQ4’s dynamic range is not enough. Frame Averaging drastically decreases shadow noise, allowing even more aggressive shadow recovery without introducing noise or losing highlight detail.

“Total Time” and “Shutter Speed” decoupled: For approximately 193 years of photographic history “shutter speed” and “total time” over which the camera exposed were the same thing. With the IQ4 you can now independently set both attributes; you have another axis along which to manipulate the photographic triangle. Do you want a waterfall with smooth silky water that comes with a multi minute exposure, but find yourself in lighting that calls for 1/8th of a second shutter speed for proper exposure? With the IQ4 Automated Frame Averaging you can select a 1/8th of a second shutter speed for the exposure brightness, but 3 minutes as the Total Time for the blurred rendering of the waterfall.

Replace your Strong ND filters: Many photographers carry a very strong ND filter (e.g. ten stops) to do long exposures in bright light. These nearly opaque filters allow the photographer to drag the shutter speed out to seconds or minutes or even hours long even in broad daylight, creating rivers and ocean that are glassy-smooth (since all waves and turbulence average out), surreal scenes of city streets that appear as a ghosted river (since any cars that flow with traffic average out to a sea of “smoke”), sidewalks that appear empty, and clouded skies that blur with an effect straight out of science fiction. The IQ4 can now do this without strong ND filters.

Special Effects: Multiple Exposure is a time-honored special effect in still photography. This tool will allow you to generate a single raw file in-camera from multiple exposures.

The IQ4 uses its best-in-class sensor-based Electronic Shutter system and generous internal ram to capture frames in immediate succession during frame averaging. In fact, at many shutter speeds the IQ4 Frame Averaging allows successive captures with no meaningful temporal gap. Traditional mechanical shutters (focal plane shutters or leaf shutters) must reset between exposures, so even the cameras with mechanical shutters capable of very high frame rates, cannot have the entire frame exposed all the time, which leads to gaps of time (aka “temporal gaps”) when the scene is not being recorded. For example, in a scene of a car driving across the desert at night, a temporal gap leads to the headlights being rendered as a series of dots rather than a continuous long blurred line. With the IQ4 each capture cycle immediately follows the previous, allowing gapless frame averaging. The ES is also beneficial to frame averaging because it generates zero vibration. With a traditional mechanical shutter (focal plane shutters or leaf shutters) there is a small amount of vibration created each time the camera captures. When averaging several or many captures together that vibration can reduce sharpness and cause visual artifacts. ES creates no vibration, so many captures can be averaged together and retain the same sharpness as a single capture.

 


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Fujifilm GFX-100: Review Coming Soon

Busy day, and so I am behind, but I have a new crown for the disintegrated molar.

Update: I expect th GFX-100 in mid July.

...

I’m hoping that the Fujifilm GFX-100 I have on order (loaner) ships out tomorrow for arrival Monday. Because I’ll be spending half my day enjoying my four damaged front teeth being ground down for temporary crowns. So I hope to have one bright spot for the day.

Fujifilm GFX-100

No Panasonic S1R style Multi-Shot High-Res mode in the GFX-100 is a bummer, but maybe Fujifilm can fix that in firmware?

My min concern is the omission of a 4-way joystick. Do I have what follows wrong and that tiny little butotn abouve AE-L is a 4-way controller (without 4 way buttons)?

Touchscreen operation is worse than worthless in so many situations, so I hope that little button does not remove the scrolling functionality, namely, forcing the use of a touchscreen requires:

  • Taking the camera away from shooting position and holding it out from the body, shifting hand position.
  • Taking gloves off.
  • Greasing up the screen with sweat or sunblock and it won’t even work with damp hands (my iPhone doesn’t)
  • Near-range vision which is physically impossible for me in dim light
  • No ability to shoot handheld while using touch.

Maybe some guy or gal in a studio with this brick on a tripod and perfect 20/20 close-range (no presbyopia) vision will love touchscreen operation. For me, it’s a clusterfuck.

I wonder how the small-button ergonomics will fare, particularly for cold weather shooting. I have two hands and this imbalanced buttons-on-the right thing bugs me—with that big a body, I just don't get so many buttons have to all be on the right and too small—it forces me to grab the camera with the left hand and reposition my right hand out of shooting-ready position.

As I discussed in my four-part series Maximize Image Quality with Shot Discipline articles at , perfect shot execution and outstanding lenses are going to be needed for the extremely high pixel density of a 100 megapixel 44 X 33mm sensor. Along with focus stacking.

Bottom line though is image quality. Carrying a big brick can be worth it if the images are the reward as the Hasselblad H6D-100C showed me, and the GFX-100 surely is much more manageable—but with a much smaller sensor. It is primarily on the basis of image quality that I will be evaluating it.

CLICK TO VIEW: Fujifilm Medium Format

Fujifilm GFX-100
Fujifilm GFX-100

James K writes:

The Fuji GFX-100 looks like a brick. With pixel shift or Multi-Shot High-Res mode they could have had a more appealing camera.

The smell of a Sony with a Global Shutter is in the wind. This Fall and Winter will tell the tale. The Sony Bear might leave the others like picked clean bones in Yellowstone with no meat for the wolves.

fun88官网: no one should count Sony out, and it makes me hesitate to buy anything right now. Still, if I were just shooting landscape, the appeal of high-grade Zeiss or other lenses on the Panasonic S1R with Multi-Shot High-Res mode is compelling.

Jason W writes:

Enhance Details might not be killer app for the GFX 100S the way it was for the 50R/S. As you point out, many of the GF lenses will fail to out-resolve the sensor which means there just won't be much for Enhance Details to do in terms of recovering aliased detail. The difference may end up truly being nothing.

fun88官网: some of the Fujifilm GF lenses are very sharp and all are sharp in the center, and thus color moiré and spurious detail issues might remain in the strong areas. But for several of the lenses, weak outer zones coupled with the damaging effects of distortion correction means capture of “higher resolution blur”.

However, I saw little benefit when processing Hasselblad H6D-100C and probably because of what Jason mentions: the lenses not being good enough to cause the usual optical issues—and the Fujifilm GFX-100 has far smaller pixels which means its lenses have to be better than the Hasselblad HCD lenses to incur isseus.



Avoid costly mistakes and get the ideal system for your needs: fun88官网 photographic consulting.

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 14mm, 15.5mm, 17.5mm (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 11-30mm f/4S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

Topping off my coverage of the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S are three more aperture series.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 14mm: View Through Arches

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 15.5mm: Alley View

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 17.5mm: Mosaic

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/4 through f/11, plus crops.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f9 @ 2.0 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 20:45:04
[diffraction mitigating sharpening, distortion corrected, Enhance Details, +100 shadows, LACA corrected, -63 highlights, push 1.2 stops]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 14mm
1296 | 2592 | 4320
f9 @ 10.0 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 20:50:54 [diffraction mitigating sharpening, Enhance Details]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 15.5mm
1296 | 2592 | 4320
f5.6 @ 1/5 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 20:28:26
[distortion corrected, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 17.5mm

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Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 14mm: MemChu Wide View (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 11-30mm f/4S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

The 14mm focal length of the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S is an important one for my usage at least, and so I’ve been studying it to fully understand it. This series puts the matter to rest definitively as to the across-the-frame performance at distance.

The series assesses the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S at 14mm on a far distance scene. It offers a look at the best possible results from the lens at 14mm. Also included is an assessment of diffraction losses at f/8 and f/11 with and without diffraction mitigating sharpening.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 14mm: MemChu Wide View

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/4 through f/11, plus crops.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f5.6 @ 1/6 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 20:30:52
[distortion corrected, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 14mm

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See my Nikon mirrorless wishlist.

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The DSLR lenses can be shot on the Canon EOS R with the Canon Mount Adapter EF-EOS R (currently included with the Canon EOS R along with the discount).

At this point the Canon RF lenses below are so impressive that I am not recommended any other lenses yet. The Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L is an excellent lens but I hope an RF version is coming. In the meantime, it covers the wide end superbly.

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Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Examples: Night Shooting (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 11-30mm f/4S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

This page shows examples night shooting with the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S. I love working with a ultra-wide zoom (11-24mm would be preferred though), and it seems particularly fun at night.

The Nikon Z7 does well focusing at f/4 at night—much better than the Panasonic S1R for example—the Z7 is smart enough to take its time and do it right and I felt that I could rely on its focus in most cases where it was too dark to make manual focus even feasible.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Examples: Night Shooting

Includes images up to full camera resolution.

Toggle for black and white.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f9 @ 30.0 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 21:32:48
[distortion corrected, diffraction mitigating sharpening, push 2.15 stops, USM{8,50,0}, Enhance Details, +100 shadows, LACA corrected]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 21.5mm

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Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 30mm: Burgher (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 11-30mm f/4S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

The series assesses performance of the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S at 30mm at full body portrait range.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 30mm: Burgher

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/4 through f/11, plus crops.

f5.6 @ 2.5 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 20:40:22
[distortion corrected, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 30mm

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Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 30mm: Library at Dusk (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 11-30mm f/4S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

The series assesses medium and far performance of the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S at 30mm for overall performance at dusk.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 30mm: Library at Dusk

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/4 through f/9, plus crops.

I have to give the about $1297 Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S a lot of credit for outstanding visual impact—it reminds me of the Leica 16-35mm f/3.5-4.5 Super-Vario-Elmar-SL—the NIKKOR has a lot to offer even if it outer-zone sharpness is not quite as high as I would like. It is also a heck of a nice lens to work with in terms of size/weight and balance on the Nikon Z7.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f6.3 @ 13.0 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 20:55:58
[+90 shadows, USM{8,50,0}, LACA corrected, distortion corrected, pull 0.2 stops]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 30mm
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Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 15.5mm: Palm Tree (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 11-30mm f/4S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

The series assesses close to medium range performance of the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S at 15.5mm for overall performance at dusk with garish artificial lighting mixed with cool daylight.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 15.5mm: Palm Tree

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/4 through f/9, plus crops.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f4 @ 5.0 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 20:52:20
[distortion corrected, push 1.95 stops, -100 highlights, +100 shadows, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 15.5mm

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Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 14mm: Courtyard View to Tower (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 11-30mm f/4S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

The series assesses near-far performance of the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S at 14mm for overall performance on a near-to-far scene typical of landscape use.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 14mm: Courtyard View to Tower

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/4 through f/11, plus crops and some interesting analysis about the behavior at 14mm.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f4 @ 0.5 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 20:47:38
[distortion corrected, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 14mm

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Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 24mm: Fountain by Library and Tower (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 11-30mm f/4S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

The series assesses near-far performance of the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S at 24mm for overall performance on a near-to-far scene typical of landscape use.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 24mm: Fountain by Library and Tower

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/4 through f/9, plus crops.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f6.3 @ 13.0 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 20:58:52
[distortion corrected, LACA corrected, Enhance Details, +60 shadows]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 24mm

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Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S vs Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S @ 24mm: Mosaic (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 11-30mm f/4S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

The series assesses the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S at 24mm on a demanding planar target against the Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70m f/2.8 S for comparison.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S vs Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S @ 24mm: Mosaic

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/2.8 through f/11, plus crops.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f5.6 @ 1/6 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 20:22:40
[distortion corrected, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 23mm
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NuGard KX Case for iPhones and iPads.
Outstanding protection against drops and impact!
Plus, excellent grip for wet hands, cycling, etc.

My Recommendations for a Core Nikon Mirrorless System, Some with Deals

See my Nikon mirrorless wishlist.

Top notch gear for Nikon below.

These DSLR lenses can be shot on the Nikon Z7 with the Nikon FTZ lens adapter. I recommend goimg with the Nikon Z7 versus the Nikon D850 at this point, unless the goal is shooting only DSLR lenses.

The Sigma 28mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art is a stronger lens than the Nikon AF-S 28mm f/1.4E but a chore to carry. The Nikon 28mm is much more manageable in size and weight, and has a very nice rendering style. Ditto for the Nikon AF-S 105mm f/1.4E vs the Sigma 105mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art.

CLICK TO VIEW: Top Notch Gear for Nikon Z7

 


Upgrade the memory of your 2018 Mac mini up to 64GB

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 19.5mm: MemChu (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 11-30mm f/4S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

The series assesses near-far performance of the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S at 19.5mm. It affords a good sense of the overall quality and depth of field achievable for this near/far scene, but also demands lens performance on a planar subject for half the frame.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 19.5mm: MemChu

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/4through f/11, plus crops.

f8 @ 1/10 sec IS=off, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 20:15:33
[distortion corrected, LACA corrected, Enhance Details]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 19.5mm

(Gear Acquisition Syndrome)

At a Glance: Why the 2019 iMac 5K Rocks for my Photo Work, and Why the GPU is Much Less Important than 8 Fast CPU Cores

on configuring a high performance system including data integrity and backup and workflow practices.

More about the 2019 iMac 5K.

The 2019 iMac 5K I bought about 8 weeks ago is the best Mac for photography and my other work that I have ever used. Simply terrific! I don’t know yet, but I suspect that for my usage, it will be competitive with the new Mac Pro and maybe even faster, at a fraction of the price.

2019 Apple 27" iMac 5K 3.6 GHz / 8GB / 2TB / Radeon Pro Vega 48 with .

Below, one can see at a glance that a GPU is a waste of money for much of my work—it hardly gets used except when doing Enhance Details and that usage is intermittent. What do get used are the eight CPU cores (16 virtual cores). This graph over 10 minutes or so of my work in Photoshop and Zerene Stacker.

2019 iMac 5K that Lloyd uses for photography and everything (plus 128GB OWC memory)

CLICK TO VIEW: Computing



Avoid costly mistakes and get the ideal system for your needs: fun88官网 photographic consulting.

Leica 90mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL Aperture Series: Huge Pine Among Aspen (Panasonic S1R)

Get L-Mount lenses at B&H Photo.

See also this Huge Pine Among Aspen with the Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH.

This series is with the 90/2 APO. This series was shot after I (finally) understood the focus instability problem with the Leica 75/2 and achieves as good a result as possible.

In fun88官网 L-Mount Mirrorless:

Leica 90mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL Aperture Series: Huge Pine Among Aspen

Images at up to 125 megapixels plus crops along with extensive commentary. The imaging quality is spectacular. I’d love to own this extraordinary about $5150 lens in spite of its focusing instability.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f2.8 @ 1/8 sec Multi-Shot HighRes, ISO 50; 2019-06-09 19:49:07
[location “Lee Vining Canyon”, altitude 6800 ft / 2073 m, 63°F / 17°C, distortion corrected, Enhance Details, +25 shadows, push 0.1 stops, LACA corrected]
Panasonic S1R + Leica 90mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH

(Gear Acquisition Syndrome)

Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL Examples in Mountains (Panasonic S1R)

Get L-Mount lenses at B&H Photo.

These examples explore the world-class optical performance of the Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH when used on the Panasonic S1R in Multi-Shot High-Res mode. I wanted to see if I could obtain high sharpness images near dusk, and just how much detail could be captured in subjects that have more detail than the camera can normally faithfully record.

Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL Examples: Mountains

Images at up to 141 megapixels. Prepare to be impressed.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f2.8 @ 1/100 sec Multi-Shot HighRes, ISO 50; 2019-06-05 20:12:15
[location “Hwy 120 East”, altitude 7050 ft / 2149 m, 60°F / 15°C, Enhance Details, distortion corrected, LACA corrected, USM{8,50,0}, push 0.8 stops, +100 shadows]
Panasonic S1R + Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH
Hard drives or SSD.

Leica 90mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL Examples at Dusk in Multi-Shot High-Res Mode (Panasonic S1R)

Get L-Mount lenses at B&H Photo.

These examples explore the world-class optical performance of the Leica 90mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH when used on the Panasonic S1R in Multi-Shot High-Res mode. I wanted to see if I could obtain high sharpness images near dusk, and just how much detail could be captured in subjects that have more detail than the camera can normally faithfully record.

Leica 90mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL Examples: Natural Subjects at Dusk

Images at up to 141 megapixels. Prepare to be impressed.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f2 @ 1/250 sec Multi-Shot HighRes, ISO 50; 2019-06-05 20:17:14
[location “Hwy 120 East”, altitude 7050 ft / 2149 m, 60°F / 15°C, distortion corrected, push 1.45 stops, Enhance Details, USM{8,50,0}, LACA corrected]
Panasonic S1R + Leica 90mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH
1296 | 2592 | 4320
f2 @ 1/6 sec Multi-Shot HighRes, ISO 50; 2019-06-07 19:43:38
[location “Mono Craters”, altitude 7600 ft / 2316 m, 60°F / 15°C, LACA corrected, Enhance Details]
Panasonic S1R + Leica 90mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH

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Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL Focus Stacking in Multi-Shot High-Res Mode, Plus HighRes Exmples (Panasonic S1R)

Get L-Mount lenses at B&H Photo.

These examples explore the world-class optical performance of the 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH when used on the Panasonic S1R in Multi-Shot High-Res mode for focus stacking.

Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL Examples: Focus Stacking in Multi-Shot High-Res Mode

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f8 @ 1/30 sec, ISO 50; 2019-06-07 13:26:22
[location “Mono Lake”, altitude 6400 ft / 1951 m, 75°F / 23°C, distortion corrected, USM{8,50,0}, LACA corrected, focus stack 2 frames]
Panasonic S1R + Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH

Upgrade the memory of your 2018 Mac mini up to 64GB

Several Leica SL Lenses are Second to None and Ideal for Multi-Shot High-Res Mode, but...

I am finishing up my coverage of the Leica 75mm f/2 APO Summicron-SL ASPH and the Leica 90mm f/2 APO Summicron-SL ASPH in the next few days. I cannot afford them (I do want them) but there has been little reaction among my readership, so I don’t know if I’ll cover them again for a while.

Speaking in optical terms, I say without any reservation that the Leica 75/2 APO SL and Leica 90/2 APO SL are among the finest lenses I have ever tested.

While I expect the same of the Leica 35mm f/2 APO Summicron-SL ASPH, I have not yet tested it, as it is back-ordered. If it behaves like the 75mm and 90mm it will be a big winner, if like the 50/1.4 SL then it would be problematic.

Get L-Mount lenses at B&H Photo.

Were I shooting for myself at this juncture, and were money a non-issue, I’d be buying all three and shooting them on the Panasonic S1R for landscape and all static subjects as my go-to system, because when shot in Multi-Shot High-Res mode, everything else on the market today looks like a crappy downgrade. The Leica 16-35mm f/3.5-4.5 Super-Vario-Elmar-SL ASPH also for its range, though I have reservations about its performance at the wide end. The Leica 50/1.4 SL no—too many behavioral issues.

Please buy through links on this site when you buy anything!

CLICK TO VIEW: Lenses for Panasonic S1R — Lloyd’s Suggested Kit

Concerns about Leica SL lenses

Image quality aside , I have serious concerns about Leica SL lenses.

First, the unstable focus issue discussed in Unstable Focus: Orange Pine Tree Trunk is a concern. Perhaps Leica can fix it in firmware (but how does one update lens Leica SL lens firmware on a Panasonic S1R?). But since I now know how to deal with the unstable focus as explained in Panasonic S1R: Notes on Focusing in HighRes Mode, I can work with the lenses, and the results are stunning in HighRes mode. I still blanche at the wasted time and effort and damaged images from the problem but that’s water under the bridge.

Second and more worrisome*, reliability and build quality make me frown with concern, particularly internal parts and AF motor, which necessarily implicates service response time and cost, and warranty. I would like to see the quality of of the Leica SL internal parts are (teardown), and I’d like to see at least a five (5) year full warranty along with US facilities for rapid turnaround (or a loaner while being serviced).

* Multiple highly credible sources have told me incroyable things about Leica S build quality and repairs, and my own experience makes me wary.

Hard drives or SSD.

Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL Aperture Series: Natural Bonsai Above Beaver Pond (Panasonic S1R) [updated with reader comments]

Get L-Mount lenses at B&H Photo.

This aperture series looks at imaging performance from f/2 through f/8 on the Panasonic S1R in Multi-Shot High-Res mode. It was shot before understanding the unstable focus behavior, but is still impressive nonetheless. It is less about analysis than about showing off the potential of the Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH for ultra high resolution imaging.

In fun88官网 L-Mount Mirrorless:

Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL Aperture Series: Natural Bonsai Above Beaver Pond

Images at up to 125 megapixels. The lighting was lousy, but the detail and freedom from digital artifacts is spectacular.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f8 @ 0.5 sec, ISO 50; 2019-05-29 19:50:08
[location “Lundy Canyon”, altitude 8250 ft / 2515 m, 55°F / 12°C, distortion corrected, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
Panasonic S1R + Leica 75mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH

Jason W writes:

Even though I consider myself openly hostile to Leica's antics, the High Res Bonsai image on the 75mm f2 APO is the definition of excellence in draw style. Smooth while still being detailed. It's what I always liked about large format and it's a look different look vs the Zeiss lenses. A lot of Leica stuff I see looks frothy but this is superb.

fun88官网: indeed, the Leica 75mm f/2 APO Summicron-SL ASPH and the Leica 90mm f/2 APO Summicron-SL ASPH I can say without an reservation whatsoever (but speaking optically only!) two of the finest lenses I have ever used. I expect the same of the Leica 35mm f/2 APO Summicron-SL ASPH, which I am eager to test, but my order/loaner at B&H has been back-ordered a long time. Perhaps it will show up in August with a little luck, or if Leica is reading this and cares to send me one.

I have several concerns about Leica SL lenses: the unstable focus issue discussed in Unstable Focus: Orange Pine Tree Trunk is a concern, but I now know how to deal with it as explained in Panasonic S1R: Notes on Focusing in HighRes Mode.

A key concern about Leica SL lenses , and based on too many credible sources telling me incroyable things about Leica S build quality as well as my own experience, reliability over time should be a concern, particularly internal parts and AF motor, which necessarily implicates service response time and cost, and warranty. I can see pending $5K on a Zeiss Otus which should last forever barring physical damage, but Leica SL lenses make me frown with reliability concerns. I would like to see the quality of of the Leica SL internal parts are (teardown), and I’d like to see at least a five (5) year full warranty along with US facilities for rapid turnaround (or a loaner while being serviced).


Deals Updated Daily at B&H Photo

Nikon/Canon/Sony Image Quality SUCKS vs Multi-Shot High-Res Mode — Golden Age of Photography Makes me Gripe that Best Ever Cameras Could be Way Better!

See my L-mount mirrorless wishlist and Leica M wishlist.

We are in the golden age of photography, which naturally makes me so eager about what can be achieve with computational photography that an existence proof of field-usabble computational photography makes me frustrated that it exists on only one camera.

For some, the golden age of photography means the ease of the iPhone and its computational photography including panoramas, multi-lens integration into one image, and other super easy-to-use goodies. The iPhone disapoints severely unless I shoot RAW/DNG where it does quite well for what it is, but it falls flat as a general tool for numerous reasons.

For me, the golden age of photography excites because of technologies Multi-Shot High-Res Mode in real cameras, and because so much more is possible. I chafe at the delay and sparse 'delivery'.

* iPhone JPEGs are garbage (this need not be so!), with massive smearing-away of detail and outrageous posterization which makes images hyper brittle for 'post'—fine for Instagram of course, at postcard size.

Computational photography with Multi-Shot High-Res Mode

Back in late April in Thoughts on Ultra High Resolution Imagery with Multi-Shot High-Res Mode, I was feeling enthusiastic about Multi-Shot High-Res mode. This post updates my thoughts.

Latest thoughts

Here in June when I see a Nikon Z7 or Sony A7R III image now, as I have over and over with recent published images, I am gobsmacked that by comparison, the standard Bayer matrix capture quality with Nikon/Canon/Sony is CRAP compared to what is possible with Multi-Shot High-Res mode. It doesn’t matter to me that some images need to be taken in single-shot mode; I can do that when necessary. The point is that so many images I make could benefit tremendously from Multi-Shot High-Res mode. Except that Nikon and Canon and Sony have no such mode. Sony’s pixel shift is worthless in the field; every time I try it the checkerboarding ruins the image.

These Sony/Nikon/Canon cameras lacking HighRes mode grate on me in delivering images with all sorts of digital artifacts free of real per-pixel detail—the images they produce are noisy, pixellated, brittle, artifacted approximations of what is actually possible. They suck.

Panasonic has figured out computational photography well enough to deliver the most stunningly useful feature (in terms of image quality) that I have ever seen in a digital camera. So I hope it is not patented somehow, precluding these other players from implementing it.

I don’t really want to buy a Panasonic S1R because it’s all about the lenses. What I want is or* Nikon and Canon and Sony to get their shit together and implement Multi-Shot High-Res mode as good or better than Panasonic. Nor will this feeling change if we see a 70MP Sony A7R IV—it is just not going to compete.

* Either, or, all.

See my April 25 post for more thoughts.

Claude F writes:

I’ve been reading the Multi-Shot High-Res mode reviews. Your observations regarding detail, in my case Sony, are spot on. The disappointment with the current crop of camera and lenses is just that a disappointment.

Multi shot interests me but I can’t see buying a camera that does not have the glass to go with it. If I take a single shot backup and have to use the single shot and the single shot does not cut it quality wise due to an inferior lens, that’s something I’m not going to trust and certainly not going to purchase. If camera, lens, multi shot worked reliably that would be a hands down game changer. Until then, stitching, take a look at the new Hasselblad.......

fun88官网: based on past conversations, Claude prefers something in the ~35mm range. On the assumption that the Leica 35mm f/2 APO-Summicron-SL ASPH will satisfy like its 75mm and 90mm siblings, and that the focus instability workaround* applies as with the 75mm and 90mm, the Panasonic S1R Multi-Shot High-Res mode ought to please Claude like no digital camera beyond measure.

The S1R does have the glass to go with it—the Leica SL lenses. If a lens can deliver for Multi-Shot, then it delivers just as well for single shot, to the extent that that the single-shot Bayer matrix capture delivers. If the lens is disappointing in single shot, then it’s a non-starter for MultiShot.

I can say without an reservation whatsoever that in optical terms the Leica 75mm f/2 APO Summicron-SL ASPH and the Leica 90mm f/2 APO Summicron-SL ASPH are two of the finest lenses I have ever used. I expect the same of the Leica 35mm f/2 APO Summicron-SL ASPH, which I am eager to test, but my order/loaner at B&H has been back-ordered a long time.

A key concern about Leica SL lenses , and based on too many credible sources telling me incroyable things about Leica S build quality as well as my own experience, reliability over time should be a concern, particularly internal parts and AF motor, which necessarily implicates service response time and cost, and warranty. I can see pending $5K on a Zeiss Otus which should last forever barring physical damage, but Leica SL lenses make me frown with reliability concerns. I would like to see the quality of of the Leica SL internal parts are (teardown), and I’d like to see at least a five (5) year full warranty along with US facilities for rapid turnaround (or a loaner while being serviced).

* See Unstable Focus: Orange Pine Tree Trunk and how to deal with it in Panasonic S1R: Notes on Focusing in HighRes Mode.

Actual pixels crop from 187 megapixel image
f8 @ 1/4 sec Multi-Shot HighRes, ISO 50; 2019-04-24 19:21:57
[location “Lee Vining Canyon”, altitude 7400 ft / 2256 m, 60°F / 15°C, LACA corrected]
Panasonic S1R + Zeiss Milvus 135mm f/2

(Gear Acquisition Syndrome)

Sony 135mm f/1.8 GM Aperture Series: Rotten Tree Trunk (Sony A7R III)

Get Sony 135mm f/1.8 GM at B&H Photo.

This series looks at the Sony FE 135mm f/1.8 GM from f/1.8 through f/11 at close range. At this range there is very little depth of field even at f/11, so the series includes a 7-frame focus stack at f/9, showing off what is possible with this world-class performer.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Sony 135mm f/1.8 GM Aperture Series: Rotten Tree Trunk (Sony A7R III)

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/1.8 through f/11.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f5.6 @ 0.8 sec IS=off, ISO 50; 2019-06-08 19:59:26
[location “Mono Craters”, altitude 7600 ft / 2316 m, 58°F / 14°C, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
Sony A7R III + Sony FE 135mm f/1.8 GM

Deals Updated Daily at B&H Photo

Sony 135mm f/1.8 GM Examples: Mono Craters (Sony A7R III)

Get Sony 135mm f/1.8 GM at B&H Photo.

This page puts the Sony FE 135mm f/1.8 GM to use for outdoor images. The 135mm focal length offers excellent perspective compression which stacks up near/far detail for an effect that shows the curves in road or landscapes.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Sony 135mm f/1.8 GM Examples: Mono Craters (Sony A7R III)

Includes images up to full camera resolution.

I also look at flare shot towards the sun:

Sony 135mm f/1.8 GM Examples: Flare

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f8 @ 2.0 sec IS=off, ISO 50; 2019-06-08 20:24:55
[location “Hwy 120 near Mono Craters”, altitude 7600 ft / 2316 m, 58°F / 14°C, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
Sony A7R III + Sony FE 135mm f/1.8 GM
Hard drives or SSD.

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S vs Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S @ 30mm: Mosaic (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 11-30mm f/4S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

The series assesses the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S at 30mm on a demanding planar target against the Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70m f/2.8 S for comparison.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S vs Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S @ 30mm: Mosaic

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/2.8 through f/11, plus crops.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f4 @ 1/15 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 20:17:13
[distortion corrected, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 30mm

MacPerformanceGuide.com

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Distortion at 14mm, 19.5mm, 30mm

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 11-30mm f/4S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

Requiring software distortion correction guarantees that the final image can never achieve full sensor resolution in at least some areas of the frame, damaging sharpness and micro contrast in the critical central area for pincushion distortion, and damaging it in the outer zones for barrel distortion. Is that the “ultimate in optical image quality”, as per Nikon’s brochure?

When the distortion is strong enough, it isn’t even viable to find a raw conversion workflow that can (somehow) disable the EXIF flag that requires distortion correction; it’s just too awful. Such as at 14mm, below.

The page looks at optical distortion for the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S at 14mm, 19.5mm, and 30mm, showing the uncorrected and corrected image from distortion correction, along with analysis of the loss in sharpness and micro contrast.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Distortion

This performance of the 14-30mm f/4 along with that of all the other Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses shows that Nikon has made an intentional systematic tradeoff in optical design for excellence in most areas (particularly color correction) by sacrificing the most important area of all for many uses: sharpness. All while claiming optical excellence including near-zero distortion. From Nikon’s PDF lens brochure “NIKKOR-Z-Brochure.pdf”, this non-sequitur:

The ultimate in optical image quality... Less Distortion
Even at their widest apertures, NIKKOR Z lenses show virtually no distortion...

I don’t have an issue with a company making design decisions. But I find outright falsehoods unacceptable.

Contrast that to the Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L, Canon RF 85mm f/1.2L and the Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L designs, which have extremely low optical distortion along with ultra high performance—clearly pro-oriented. The two strategies are far apart; Canon’s design approach is forward-looking and results in lenses of higher cost but of long-term satisfaction, but Nikon seemingly is not targeting professional use.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
Distortion (uncorrected) at 14mm for Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S
f5.6 @ 1/5 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 20:27:10 [LACA corrected]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 14mm

Upgrade the memory of your 2019 iMac up to 128GB

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 14mm: Mosaic (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 11-30mm f/4S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

The series assesses of the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S at 14mm on a demanding planar target. The main point of interest here is sharpness, but color rendition is also a concern.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 14mm: Mosaic

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/4 through f/11, plus crops.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f5.6 @ 1/5 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 20:27:10
[distortion corrected, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 14mm
Lloyd’s Sony Mirrorless Wishlist
Hand-picked items for Sony.

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 14mm: Three Paths at Night (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 11-30mm f/4S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

The series assesses near-far performance of the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S at 14mm. It affords a good sense of the overall quality and depth of field achievable for this near/far scene.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S Aperture Series @ 14mm: Three Paths at Night

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/4 through f/11, plus crops.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f6.3 @ 15.0 sec, ISO 31; 2019-06-19 21:07:42
[distortion corrected, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S @ 14mm
Protect Your Phone
NuGard KX Case for iPhones and iPads.
Outstanding protection against drops and impact!
Plus, excellent grip for wet hands, cycling, etc.

Focusing Zeiss DSLR Lenses For Peak Performance, PART ONE: The Challenges

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

One thing striking to me is the concern with gear, particularly lens performance, but the elephant in the room sees much less attention and interest: shot discipline and general ways of making sharp images. With high-resolution digital, shot discipline and technique and focus stacking are more important than most lens differences.

From lenspire.zeiss.com, February 2016.

Focusing Zeiss DSLR Lenses For Peak Performance, PART ONE: The Challenges

Focusing Zeiss DSLR Lenses For Peak Performance PART TWO: Tips and Best Practices for Sharply Focused Images

All Lenspire articles by Lloyd.

Below, one of serveral videos from that article.

Video: Introduction to focus and related issues


Upgrade the memory of your 2018 Mac mini up to 64GB

Third-Party Lenses for Nikon Z Mirrorless and Canon EOS R Mirrorless

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

Sony has won the mirrorless wars—I think it’s game over given how things stand and unless/until Nikon and Canon dish out some strong persuasion that would break their modus operandi.

Still, Nikon and Canon have heartbeats and third parties are showing up with some lenses, as below. Not one reader has expressed interest in such lenses, but maybe that will change.

Where are Zeiss and Sigma with respect to Nikon Z and Canon EOS R?

CLICK TO VIEW: Third-Party Lenses for Nikon Z Mirrorless and Canon EOS R Mirrorless

Lloyd’s Sony Mirrorless Wishlist
Hand-picked items for Sony.

Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S Aperture Series and Focus Shift Evaluation @ 31mm: Huge Old Pine, Its Needles and Cones (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

When I shot this scene, I did so partly to check for focus shift, which proved prescient. The field curvature and focus shift behaviors of the Nikon 24-70; must be understood for optimal results.

This series looks at a quite pronounced focus shift of the Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S at 31mm from f/2.8 through f/11. It confirms the findings of a moderately strong focus shift also seen in Natural Bonsai over Beaver Pond and details how much shift and how to compensate for it.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S Aperture Series and Focus Shift Evluation @ 31mm: Huge Old Pine, Its Needles and Cones

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/2.8 through f/11, plus crops. I would have shown a stacked image, but for the first time, the Nikon Z7 “focus stack” features failed, generating incompatible images—dunno what happened.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f2.8 @ 1/20 sec IS=off, ISO 31; 2019-06-07 18:45:08
[location “Mono Craters”, altitude 7600 ft / 2316 m, 60°F / 15°C, distortion corrected, Enhance Details, LACA corrected]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S @ 31mm

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Announced: Hasselblad X1D-50C II, all-new Hasselblad CFV II 50C Digital Back and Hasselblad 907X

Get Hasselblad medium format at B&H Photo.

Hasselblad has announced the medium format Hasselblad X1D-50C II priced at about $5750, along with the first zoom for the Hasselblad X system, the Hasselblad XCD 35-75mm f/3.5-4.5 zoom (about $5175).

Also announced is the Hasselblad CFV II 50C digital back on the all-new Hasselblad 907X.

With respect to Hasselblad X1D-50C II, at least two issues have been addressed: the ability to use menus within the EVF, and cutting the startup time in half. No word on battery life however. Ergonomics have been one frustration, and I had hoped to see the inclusion of a 4-way controller as found on most cameras; the lack of one is a usability problem for me in so many circumstances that makes for slow operation, particularly scrolling through an image when reviewing or focusing—“minimalistic” design with form before function is flawed thinking—I don’t sit around admiring the camera with my eyes; I operate it with my hands! With the best camera designs (Nikon D850, Nikon Z7), I can operate a camera much more efficiently with appropriate design for two hands, which is a big deal in some shooting conditions. Ditto for buttons and gloved hands. It is possible to satisfy a wider range of usage scenarios by attending to such things in the design phase without disrupting the sleek look—one can have svelte form with function.

2019-06-19 HASSELBLAD EXPANDS REACH OF MEDIUM FORMAT IMAGING FOR EVEN MORE CREATIVE VERSATILITY

Introducing the X1D II 50C, XCD 35-75 zoom lens, Phocus Mobile 2, and revealing details of the upcoming CFV II 50C digital back and 907X camera body.

Following the revolutionary introduction of the world’s first mirrorless medium format digital camera, the X1D-50c, Hasselblad introduces new additions to its product portfolio that bring the joy of medium format photography to image makers with the capabilities to support their creative endeavours. This includes the evolved X1D II 50C camera, the eagerly awaited XCD 3,5-4,5/35-75 Zoom Lens and Phocus Mobile 2. In addition, Hasselblad reveals the development details of the upcoming CFV II 50C digital back and 907X camera body. Hasselblad’s newest offerings yet again expand the potential of medium format photography with modularity and flexibility, all while offering the brand’s renowned, stunning image quality.

Hasselblad X1D II 50C, rear

X1D II 50C – AN EVOLVED MEDIUM FORMAT PHOTOGRAPHY EXPERIENCE

In the pursuit to continue the journey of taking medium format outside of the studio, Hasselblad is pleased to announce the next installment of the X System – the X1D II 50C Mirrorless Medium Format Digital Camera. Dedicated to optimizing the X System for a wider audience of creatives, Hasselblad has listened to user feedback and improved upon the first generation with enhanced electronics for a quicker and more intuitive medium format experience.

Continuing in the legacy of being the most portable and lightweight digital medium format camera, the X1D II 50C lets you take the power of medium format in a footprint smaller than most full frame DSLRs in a beautifully designed, compact package. Its large, high resolution 50-megapixel CMOS sensor (43.8 x 32.9 mm) is 1.7 times larger than 35mm full format sensors, packing in huge pixels (5.3 x 5.3 μm) for capturing images with superb tonality. With outstanding colour depth and an impressive dynamic range of 14 stops, which allows for capturing immense details in both shadows and highlights, the photographer is left with plenty of room for adjustment in post-processing.

With Hasselblad Natural Colour Solution (HNCS) technology integrated into the camera’s system, exceptional, true-to-life tones are delivered that match what the human eye sees. Building upon the award-winning first generation, the X1D II 50C blends form and function with minimalistic, Scandinavian design aesthetics with a graphite grey exterior and a smooth handling experience with its ergonomic grip. The new X1D II 50C continues to provide creatives with incredible Hasselblad image quality, with 16-bit RAW images and now full resolution JPEGs, in a compact, lightweight design.

Developing upon the first generation of the X System, the X1D II 50C’s upgraded electronic platform includes a higher resolution 3.6-inch 2.36-million-dot touch display, which is physically the largest LCD display currently available on a digital medium format camera. Additionally, the X1D II 50C features a higher resolution enhanced OLED electronic viewfinder (EVF) with 3.69-million dots and a high magnification of 0.87x, letting you see the bigger picture. The much higher resolution of the rear display screen (1024x768) gives a more vivid, true to life image viewing experience. The X1D II 50C’s live view features a faster refresh rate, reduced shutter lag and black out time between frames, an improved continuous capture rate, and a startup time cut almost in half from the first generation. Building upon the highly-intuitive Hasselblad User Interface (HUI) of the previous model, further refinements have been made to the X1D II 50C to improve the camera’s handling experience, including the ability to access the menu system when looking in the EVF, giving greater usability in the sunniest conditions.

Enabling an even more portable medium format workflow, Hasselblad’s post production solutions now include the new Phocus Mobile 2. Connected via USB-C and Wi-Fi, photographers can transfer RAW and full quality JPEG files directly from the X1D II 50C and edit RAW images on their iPad Pro or iPad Air (2019) while out on the field.

Hasselblad X1D II 50C, top
Hasselblad X1D II 50C, front
Hasselblad X1D II 50C, front oblique
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Announced: Hasselblad CFV II 50C Digital Back and Hasselblad 907X V Camera Body

Get Hasselblad medium format at B&H Photo.

Along with the update Hasselblad X1D II 50C, announced is the modernized V system: Hasselblad CFV II 50C digital back along with the Hasselblad 907X.

Hasselblad CFV II 50C digital back on Hasselblad 907X

In some ways the 907X may be more appealing to me—I hope to test it at some point.

THE CFV II 50C AND 907X CONNECT HASSELBLAD’S PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY INTO ONE SYSTEM

Hasselblad proudly announces the development of the modernised CFV II 50C digital back and the brand new 907X camera body, which together will connect Hasselblad’s photographic history into one system.

The CFV II 50C digital back, which will have an outstanding medium format 50-megapixel CMOS sensor (43.8 x 32.9 mm), will enable use with most V System cameras made from 1957 and onwards in addition to third party technical or view cameras. Improving upon the user experience of the previous generations, the CFV II 50C will feature a brilliant tilt screen with full touch support and Hasselblad’s renowned user interface for settings, image review, and menu navigation.

Users of previous CFV digital backs will appreciate a new fully-integrated battery, the same used on the X System, which will reduce overall size and with the option to recharge in-camera via the USB-C port. Combining its iconic aesthetics with modern technology, the CFV II 50C gives a nod to Hasselblad’s history combined with the brand’s world-renowned image quality.

Coupling the CFV II 50C with Hasselblad’s smallest medium format camera body ever, the 907X, creates a highly compact package. This combination will offer a truly distinct photographic experience, including the classic waist-level shooting style of the V System enabled by the CFV II 50C’s tilt screen. With the 907X, the photographer will gain access to all of the high-quality X System Lenses in addition to a vast range of Hasselblad optics via adapters, including the H System, V System, and XPan Lenses. In addition, the 907X will enable compatibility with a wide range of third-party adapters and lenses. Planned accessories to beautifully complement the combination include the 907X Control Grip and 907X External Optical Viewfinder.

Hasselblad 907X with Hasselblad CFV II 50C Digital Back and XCD lens
Hasselblad CFV II 50C Digital Back


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Hasselblad XCD 35-75mm f/3.5-4.5 Zoom Lens Announced

Get Hasselblad medium format at B&H Photo.

Hasselblad has announced the Hasselblad XCD 35-75mm f/3.5-4.5 zoom along with the updated Hasselblad X1D, now the Hasselblad X1D-50C II.

I am looking forward to testing the new Hasselblad XCD 35-75mm zoom on the new Hasselblad X1D-50C II, along with the Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 and Hasselblad XCD 135mm f/2.8, neither of which I also have not yet tested.

Hasselblad XCD 35-75mm f/3.5-4.5

THE NEW XCD 3,5-4,5/35-75 – PRIME LENS PERFORMANCE IN A COMPACT ZOOM

The ninth addition to the X System lens range is the eagerly awaited XCD 3,5-4,5/35-75 Zoom Lens. Delivering the same superb image quality from edge-to-edge as the XCD prime lenses, this extremely high performance, compact mid-range zoom covers moderate wide angle to short telephoto focal lengths.

Its internal focusing keeps the lens’ dimensions constant, delivers quick autofocus and additionally keeps the overall weight down. Ideal for shooting anything from wide angle landscapes to portrait images, this lens is perfect for photographers who are looking to keep the amount of equipment they carry when travelling to a minimum but don’t want to compromise on image quality.

“This really is the best lens Hasselblad has developed – its performance is extremely high, competing with our prime lenses. I can even go as far to say that it’s probably the best zoom lens currently available on the market,” says Per Nordlund, Hasselblad Lead Optical Designer.

Like the rest of the XCD lens range, the XCD 35-75 features an integral central lens shutter, offering exposure times from 68 minutes to 1/2000s with full flash synchronisation throughout.

Hasselblad XCD 35-75mm f/3.5-4.5

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Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S Aperture Series @ 24mm: Bonsai View Down Lundy Canyon (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

This series looks at general performance from near to very far of the Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S at 24mm from f/2.8 through f/11, with a focus on sharpness. The results here are among the best I have seen at 24mm, and impressive.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S Aperture Series @ 24mm: Bonsai View Down Lundy Canyon

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/2.8 through f/11, plus crops.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f11 @ 10.0 sec IS=off, ISO 31; 2019-05-29 20:19:48
[location “Lundy Canyon”, altitude 8250 ft / 2515 m, 55°F / 12°C, distortion corrected, Enhance Details, LACA corrected, diffraction mitigating sharpening]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S @ 24mm

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Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S Aperture Series and Focus Stack @ 54mm: Old Gnarled Rootball (Nikon Z7)

Get Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S and Nikon NIKKOR Z lenses at B&H Photo.

This series looks at general performance from near to far of the Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S at 54mm from f/2.8 through f/9, and includes a 4-frame focus stack*. The usage case here is landscape field shooting using the Nikon Z7 “focus shift” feature versus conventional stopping down, with commentary on same.

In fun88官网 Mirrorless:

Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S Aperture Series and Focus Stack @ 54mm: Old Gnarled Rootball

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/2.8 through f/9, plus a 4-frame focus stack at f/6.3.

1296 | 2592 | 4320
f6.3 @ 20.0 sec IS=off, ISO 100; 2019-06-07 20:43:19
[location “Mono Craters”, altitude 7600 ft / 2316 m, 60°F / 15°C, distortion corrected, LACA corrected, focus stack 4 frames]
NIKON Z7 + Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S @ 54mm

Get up to 16x more storage and 2x the speeds of the original drive

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